Etymology
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plate (v.)

"to cover (something) with a layer of metal or mail," late 14c., platen, from plate (n.). Related: Plated.

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ply (n.)

"a layer, a fold," 1530s, from French pli "a fold" (13c.), alteration of Old French ploi "fold, pleat, layer" (12c.), verbal noun from ployer (later pleier) "to bend, to fold," from Latin plicare "to fold, lay" (from PIE root *plek- "to plait"). Often used to indicate the number of thicknesses of which anything is made; this also is the ply in plywood.

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sandpaper (n.)

also sand-paper, "stout paper with a fixed layer of sharp sand," 1788, from sand (n.) + paper (n.).

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laminar (adj.)
"made or arranged in layers," 1811, from Latin lamina "thin plate, slice, layer" (see laminate (v.)) + -ar.
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mother-of-pearl (n.)

"nacreous inner layer of the shell of various bivalve mollusks," c. 1500, translating Medieval Latin mater perlarum, with the first element perhaps connected in popular imagination with obsolete mother (n.2) "dregs." Compare Italian madreperla, French mère-perle, Dutch parelmoer, German Perlmutter, Danish perlemor. It is the stuff of pearls but in a layer instead of a mass.

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laminate (v.)
1660s, "to beat or roll into thin plates," from Latin lamina "thin piece of metal or wood, thin slice, plate, leaf, layer," a word of unknown origin; de Vaan writes that "The only serious etymology offered is a connection with latus 'wide' ...." Many modern senses in English are from the noun meaning "an artificial thin layer" (1939), especially a type of plastic adhesive. Related: Laminated; laminating; laminable.
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stratus (n.)
"a low layer of cloud," 1803, from Latin stratus "a spreading," from noun use of past participle of sternere "to spread out, lay down, stretch out," from nasalized form of PIE root *stere- "to spread."
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bedding (n.)
late Old English beddinge "materials of a bed, bed covering," from bed (n.). Meaning "bottom layer of anything" is from c. 1400.
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cambium (n.)
1670s in botany, "layer of tissue between the wood and the bark," from Late Latin cambium "exchange," from Latin cambiare "change" (see change (v.)).
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Creamsicle (n.)

small slab of ice cream surrounded by a layer of fruit-flavored water ice and mounted on a stick, 1932, a trademark name, merger of ice-cream and Popsicle.

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