Etymology
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jest (n.)
early 13c., geste, "narrative of exploits," from Old French geste "action, exploit," from Latin gesta "deeds," neuter plural of gestus, past participle of gerere "to carry, behave, act, perform" (see gest, which preserves the original sense). Sense descended through "idle tale" (late 15c.) to "mocking speech, raillery" (1540s) to "joke" (1550s). Also "a laughing-stock" (1590s). Jest-book is from 1690s.
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rofl (interj.)

by 1993, online chat abbreviation for rolling on the floor laughing.

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lol (interj.)
by 1993, computer chat abbreviation of laughing out loud.
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LMAO 
by 1997, online abbreviation of laughing my ass off. Related: LMFAO (by 2000).
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makeweight (n.)

also make-weight, 1690s, "small quantity of something added to make the total reach a certain weight," from make (v.) + weight. Meaning "thing or person of little account made use of" is from 1776.

MAKE WEIGHT. A small candle: a term applied to a little slender man. [Grose, "Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue," London, 1785]

For the formation, compare makeshift, also make-sport (1610s), makegame (1762) "a laughing stock, a butt for jokes;" makebate "one who excites contentions and quarrels" (1520s); makepeace "a peace-maker, one who reconciles persons at variance" (early 13c. as a surname).

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restock (v.)

also re-stock, "fit with a new supply, replenish," 1670s, from re- "again" + stock (v.). Related: Restocked; restocking.

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stockyard (n.)
also stock-yard, "enclosure for sorting and keeping cattle, swine, sheep, etc.," typically connected with a railroad or slaughter-house, 1802, from stock (n.1) + yard (n.1).
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sku (n.)
by 1974, acronym from stock-keeping unit.
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irrisory (adj.)
"given to sneering or laughing derisively at others," 1824, from Late Latin irrisorius "mocking," from irrisor "a mocker," from stem of Latin irridere "to laugh at, make fun of," from assimilated form of in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + ridere "to laugh" (see risible). Related: irrision (1520s), from Latin irrisionem, noun of action from the verb.
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buy-in (n.)
"act of obtaining an interest in," 1970, from verbal phrase buy in "to purchase a commission or stock" (1826), from buy (v.) + in (adv.). To buy into "obtain an interest in by purchase" (as of stock shares) is recorded from 1680s.
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