Etymology
Advertisement
Asclepius 
Latinized form of Greek Asklepios, which is of unknown origin. Beekes writes that "The name is typical for Pre-Greek words ...." Originally a Thessalian prince famous as a physician, later regarded as a son of Apollo and god of medicine.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Illyria 
ancient name of the country on the east shore of the Adriatic, at its greatest extending inland to the Danube, a name of obscure origin. Later a name of a division of Austria-Hungary including Carinthia, Slovenia, and the coastal region around Istria. Related: Illyrian.
Related entries & more 
Singh 
common surname and middle name in North India, later (1699) adopted by Sikhs as a title after their initiation ceremony, also a surname adopted by male Sikhs; 1620s in English, from Hindi Singh, from Sanskrit simhah "lion."
Related entries & more 
Oneida 

Iroquois people of upper N.Y. state (they later moved in part to Wisconsin), 1660s, named for their principal settlement, the name of which is from Oneida onenyote', literally "erected stone," containing -neny- "stone" and -ot- "to stand."

Related entries & more 
Nixon 

surname, a spelling variant of Nickson, literally "son of (a man named) Nick, English familiar form of Nicholas. Nixonian is from 1959 in reference to the ways and means of U.S. vice president (later president) Richard M. Nixon (1913-1994). Related: Nixonite; Nixonomics.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Bacchus 
Greek god of wine and revelry, a later name of Dionysus, late 15c., from Latin Bacchus, from Greek Bakkhos, perhaps related to Latin bacca "berry, fruit of a tree or shrub" (see bay (n.4)), or from an Asian language. Perhaps originally a Thracian fertility god.
Related entries & more 
Antonine (adj.)
1680s, in reference to Roman emperors Antoninus Pius (ruled 138-161 C.E.) and Marcus Aurelius Antoninus (161-180). For the name, see Anthony. Earlier (1540s) of the followers of St. Anthony of Egypt; later Antonian (1904) was used in this sense.
Related entries & more 
Mede 

"native or inhabitant of ancient Media," the ancient kingdom south of the Caspian Sea, later a part of the Persian empire, late 14c., from Latin Medus, from Greek Medos "Mede," from the indigenous people-name Medes, which is said to be from the name of their first king (Medos).

Related entries & more 
Big Ben (n.)
clock-bell in the Parliament tower in London, by 1861, generally said to have been named for Sir Benjamin Hall (1802-1867), first Chief Commissioner of Works, under whose supervision the bell was cast. The name later was extended to the clock itself and its tower.
Related entries & more 
Belial 
early 13c., from Late Latin, from Greek, from Hebrew bel'yya'al "destruction," literally "worthless," from b'li "without" + ya'al "use." Wickedness as an evil force (Deuteronomy xiii.13); later treated as a proper name of Satan (2 Corinthians vi.15), though Milton made him one of the fallen angels.
Related entries & more 

Page 2