Etymology
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swig (n.)
1540s, "a drink, liquor," later "big or hearty drink of liquor" (1620s), of unknown origin.
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churchman (n.)

"an ecclesiastic, a clergyman," mid-13c., from church (n.) + man (n.). Later "an adherent of the Church of England."

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newscast (n.)

"a broadcast of news on radio or (later) television or the internet," 1930, from news + -cast, from broadcast.

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fave (n.)

1938, perhaps a Variety magazine coinage, slang shortening of favorite (n.). Later also as an adjective.

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extra-special (adj.)
1841, from extra- + special (adj.). Originally of legislative sessions, later (1880s) of certain editions of daily newspapers.
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wiring (n.)
"wires collectively," 1809, later especially "electrical wirework" (1887), from present participle of wire (v.).
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colewort (n.)

late 14c., "cabbage," later especially "kale, greens;" from cole (n.1) + wort.

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drayage (n.)

1791, "fee for conveyance by dray," from dray + -age. Later also simply "conveyance by dray."

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giglot (n.)
"lewd, wanton woman" (mid-14c.); later "a giddy, romping girl;" of unknown origin; compare gig (n.1).
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lateral (adj.)

"of or pertaining to the side," early 15c., from Old French latéral (14c.) and directly from Latin lateralis "belonging to the side," from latus (genitive lateris) "the side, flank of humans or animals, lateral surface," a word of uncertain origin. Specific sense "situated on either side of the median vertical longitudinal plane of the body" [Century Dictionary] is from 1722.

As a noun, from 1630s, "a side part;" as a type of pass to the side in U.S. football, it is attested from 1934 (short for lateral pass). Related: Laterally.

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