Etymology
Advertisement
Advertisement
mine-sweeper (n.)
1905, from mine (n.2) + agent noun from sweep (v.).
Related entries & more 
land-shark (n.)
"person who cheats or robs sailors ashore," 1769, from land (n.) + shark (n.). Smyth ("Sailor's Word-book," 1867) lists the types as "Crimps, pettifogging attorneys, slopmongers, and the canaille infesting the slums of seaport towns." As "land-grabber, speculator in real estate" from 1839. In both senses often in Australian and New Zealand publications during 19c.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Cloud Cuckoo Land 

imaginary city built in air, 1830, translating Aristophanes' Nephelokokkygia in "The Birds" (414 B.C.E.). Cloud-land "place above the earth or away from the practical things of life, dreamland, the realm of fancy" is attested from 1840.

Related entries & more 
no-man's-land (n.)

also no man's land, "terrain between front lines of entrenched armies," 1908, popularized in World War I; earlier a tract or district to which no one has an established claim; a region which is the subject of dispute between two parties" (by 1876). Nonemanneslond (early 14c.) was the name given to an unowned waste ground outside the north wall of London, the site of executions. No man (Old English nanne mon) was an old way of saying "nobody."

Related entries & more 
landmine (n.)

also land-mine, "explosive device placed on the ground (or just under it) as a weapon," 1871, from land (n.) + mine (n.2).

Related entries & more 
minefield (n.)

"area of land planted with explosive mines," 1877, from mine (n.2) + field (n.). Figurative meaning, "subject or situation fraught with unseen dangers," is by 1947.

Related entries & more 
miner (n.)

c. 1300 (early 13c. as a surname), "one who mines, a person engaged in digging for metals or minerals or in digging a military mine," from Old French mineour (13c.), agent noun from miner "to mine" (see mine (v.1)).

Related entries & more 

Page 2