Etymology
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Malawi 

East African nation, independent under that name since 1964, from the name of an indigenous people. From 1907 to 1964 it was known as Nyasaland, from Lake Nyasa (now Lake Malawi), from the Swahili word for "lake."

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Mareotic (adj.)

"of or pertaining to Lake Mareotis" in Lower Egypt, from Latin Mareoticus, from Greek Mareōtikos, from Mareōtis (limne), from Egyptian Mer, Mir, name of a city on the lake.

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Manitoba 
Canadian province, named for the lake, which was named for an island in the lake; from Algonquian manitou "great spirit" (see manitou).
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lough (n.)
"a lake, pool," early 14c., Anglo-Celtic, representing a northern form of Irish and Gaelic loch, Welsh llwch, from PIE *laku- (see lake (n.1), and compare loch).
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Chad 

African nation, former French colony (Tchad), independent since 1960, named for Lake Chad, which is from a local word meaning "lake, large expanse of water." An ironic name for such a desert country. Related: Chadian.

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loch (n.)

late 14c., from Gaelic loch "lake, lake-like body," including the narrow, nearly land-locked arms of the sea found in the glacier-scoured landscape of west Scotland; cognate with Old Irish loch "body of water, lake," Breton lagen, Anglo-Irish lough, Latin lacus (see lake (n.1)). "The word was adopted in ONorthumbrian as luh" [OED]. The diminutive form is lochan.

The phrase Loch Ness monster is attested by 1934, the thing itself under slightly different names from 1933. The loch is named for the river Ness that flows out of it at Inverness; the river name is probably from an Old Celtic word meaning "roaring one."

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mere (n.1)

"pool, small lake, pond," from Old English mere "sea, ocean; lake, pool, pond, cistern," from Proto-Germanic *mari (source also of Old Norse marr, Old Saxon meri "sea," Middle Dutch maer, Dutch meer "lake, sea, pool," Old High German mari, German Meer "sea," Gothic marei "sea," mari-saiws "lake"), from PIE root *mori- "body of water." The larger sense of "sea, arm of the sea" has been obsolete since Middle English. Century Dictionary reports it "Not used in the U.S. except artificially in some local names, in imitation of British names."

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ardurous (adj.)
"full of ardor," 1770, perhaps a variant of arduous with overtones of ardor. Useful only to poets, and as it is first attested in Chatterton, perhaps a faux medievalism.
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Niagara 
waterfall from Lake Erie to Lake Ontario, from a town name, perhaps from an Iroquoian language and meaning "a neck" (between two bodies of water); general sense of "a cataract, torrent" is attested from 1841; meaning " 'shower' of ringlets (true or false) in women's hair" is from 1864, also known as cataract curls.
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Zurich 
city and lake in Switzerland, German Zürich, said to be ultimately from Celtic root *dur- "water."
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