Etymology
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a la carte 
"ordered by separate items" (itemized on a bill); distinguished from a table d'hôte, indicating a meal served at a fixed, inclusive price; 1826, from French à la carte, literally "by the card" (see a la + card (n.1)).
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cherchez la femme 
French, literally "seek the woman," on the notion that a woman is the cause for whatever crime has been committed, first used by Alexandre Dumas père in "Les Mohicans de Paris" (1864) in the form cherchons la femme. French chercher is from Latin circare, in Late Latin "to wander hither and thither," from circus "circle" (see circus).
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La-Z-Boy 
brand of recliner chair, 1929, Floral City Furniture Co., Monroe, Michigan, U.S. According to company lore, chosen from names submitted in a contest. See lazy + boy.
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hasta la vista 
Spanish, literally "until the meeting (again)," salutation in parting.
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la-di-da (interj.)
mocking affected gentility, 1874, a derisive imitation of the "swell" way of talking. Compare lardy-dardy (1859).
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creme de la creme (n.)
"elite, finest flower of society," 1848, from French crème de la crème, literally "the cream of the cream" (see cream (n.)).
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lavalier (n.)
kind of ornament that hangs around the neck, 1873, from French lavallière, a kind of tie, after Louise Françoise de La Baume Le Blanc de La Vallière, Duchesse de La Vallière (1644-1710), mistress of Louis XIV from 1661-1667.
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labonza (n.)
"belly," 1943, American English slang, probably from dialectal pronunciation of Italian la pancia "the belly," with the definite article absorbed, from Latin pantex (genitive panticis) "belly" (see paunch).
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ooh (interj.)

exclamation of pain, surprise, wonder, etc., attested by 1916. The number of -o-s may vary. Combined with aah from 1953. Ooh-la-la, exclamation of surprise or appreciation, is attested by 1918, from French ô là! là! and suggestive of the supposed raciness of the French.

France is one fine country and we have been having a pretty good time. The people treat the Americans very well and the pretty girls,—'ooh, la, la!", as they say. ["The Princeton Alumni Weekly," May 29, 1918]
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lariat (n.)
rope or cord used for tying or catching horses, 1832, American English, from Spanish la reata "the rope," from reatar "to tie against," from re- "back" (see re-) + atar "to tie," from Latin aptare "to join," from aptus "fitted" (see apt). Compare lasso.
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