Etymology
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oodles (n.)

"abundance, a large quantity," 1866, American English (Tennessee), perhaps from the caboodle in kit and caboodle.

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erector (n.)

1530s, "one who builds," agent noun in Latin form from erect (v.). In reference to muscles from 1831. The children's building kit Erector (commonly known as an Erector set) was sold from 1913.

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brainiac (n.)
"very smart person," 1982, U.S. slang, from brain (n.) + ending from ENIAC, etc. Brainiac also was the name of a comic book villain in the Superman series and a do-it-yourself computer building kit, both from the late 1950s, and the word may bear traces of either or both of these.
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cheetah (n.)

"large, spotted cat of India," 1704, from Hindi chita "leopard," from Sanskrit chitraka "hunting leopard, tiger," literally "speckled," from chitra-s "distinctively marked, variegated, many-colored, bright, clear" (from PIE *kit-ro-, from root *skai- "to shine, gleam, be bright;" see shine (v.)) + kayah "body," from PIE *kwei- "to build, make" (see poet).

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merman (n.)

"fabulous sea-creature, man above and fish below," c. 1600, literally "man of the sea," from first element in mermaid (q.v.) + man (n.). The gender-neutral merpeople (1849 "Kit Bam's Adventures") and merfolk (1846) "inhabitants of the sea with human bodies and fish-like tails" seem to be more recent formations.

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valise (n.)

1610s, "suitcase, soldier's kit bag," from French valise (16c.), from Italian valigia, a word of uncertain origin. Attested in Medieval Latin forms valisia (early 15c.), valixia (late 13c.). "The name is generally given to a leather case of moderate size, opening wide on a hinge or like a portfolio ...." [Century Dictionary]

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kitchen sink (n.)

sink to wash food, dishes, etc., 1824. Phrase everything but (or and) the kitchen sink is attested from 1944, from World War II armed forces slang, in reference to intense bombardment.

Out for blood, our Navy throws everything but the kitchen sink at Jap vessels, warships and transports alike. [Shell fuel advertisement, Life magazine, Jan. 24, 1944]

Earlier was everything but the kitchen stove (1919).

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kitschy (adj.)
1965, from kitsch + -y (2). Related: Kitchiness.
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kitty-corner 

also kittycorner, kitty-cornered, kittycornered, etc., see catty-cornered.

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box-kite (n.)
1898, from box (n.1) + kite (n.), so called for its shape.
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