Etymology
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kicky (adj.)
1790, "clever; showy, gaudy," from kick (n.) in the 18c. sense "that which is stylish" + -y (2). Meaning "full of thrills, providing kicks" is from 1968. Kickish "given to kicking" is from 1580s.
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kickback (n.)
also kick-back, "mechanical reaction in an engine," from 1905 in various mechanical senses, from the verbal phrase (1895); see kick (v.) + back (adv.). By 1926 the verbal phrase was being used in a slang sense of "be forced to return pelf, pay back to victims," which was extended to illegal partial give-backs of government-set wages that were extorted from workers by employers. Hence the noun in the sense of "illegal or improper payment" (1932). The verbal phrase in the sense "make oneself comfortable, prepare to relax" is from 1975.
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kink (n.)

1670s, "knot-like contraction or short twist in a rope, thread, hair, etc., originally a nautical term, from Dutch kink "twist in a rope" (also found in French and Swedish), which is probably related to Old Norse kikna "to bend backwards, sink at the knees" as if under a burden" (see kick (v.)). Figurative sense of "odd notion, mental twist, whim" first recorded in American English, 1803, in writings of Thomas Jefferson; specifically "a sexual perversion, fetish, paraphilia" is by 1973 (by 1965 as "sexually abnormal person").

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boot (v.1)
"to kick, drive by kicking," 1877, American English, from boot (n.1). Earlier "to beat with a boot" (a military punishment), 1802. Generalized sense of "eject, kick (out)" is from 1880. To give (someone) the boot "dismiss, kick out" is from 1888. Related: Booted; booting.
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recalcitrate (v.)

1620s, "to kick out," from Latin recalcitratus, past participle of recalcitrare "to kick back" (see recalcitrant). Sense of "resist obstinately" is from 1759. Related: Recalcitrated; recalcitrating; recalcitration.

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punt (n.1)

in football, "a kick of the ball as it is dropped from the hands and before it strikes the ground," 1845; from punt (v.).

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tae kwon do 
1967, from Korean, said to represent tae "kick" + kwon "fist" + do "art, way, method."
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footer (n.)
c. 1600, "a pedestrian;" 1781, "a kick at football;" 1863, British student slang, "the game of football;" see foot (n.), football, -er.
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runback (n.)

also run-back, by 1944 in U.S. football, "a run to advance the ball after catching a kick or punt," from the verbal phrase; see run (v.) + back (adv.).

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recalcitrant (adj.)

"refusing to submit, not submissive or compliant," 1823, from French récalcitrant, literally "kicking back" (17c.-18c.), from Late Latin recalcitrantem (nominative recalcitrans), present participle of recalcitrare "to kick back" (of horses), also "be inaccessible," in Late Latin "to be petulant or disobedient;" from re- "back" (see re-) + Latin calcitrare "to kick," from calx (genitive calcis) "heel" (see calcaneus). Used from 1797 as a French word in English.

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