Etymology
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junky (adj.)
"run-down, seedy, trashy," 1876, from junk (n.1) + -y (2).
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accumulate (v.)
1520s, "to heap up" (transitive), from Latin accumulatus, past participle of accumulare "to heap up, amass," from ad "to," here perhaps emphatic (see ad-), + cumulare "heap up," from cumulus "heap" (from suffixed form of PIE root *keue- "to swell"). From 1759 in intransitive sense of "grow in size or number." Related: Accumulated; accumulating.
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cumulate (v.)

1530s, "gather into a heap or mass" (transitive), from Latin cumulatus "heaped, increased, augmented," past participle of cumulare "to heap," from cumulus "mound, heap" (from suffixed form of PIE root *keue- "to swell"). Related: Cumulated; cumulating; cumulant.

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acervate (v.)

"to heap up," 1610s, from Latin acervatus, past participle of acervare "to heap up," from acervus "heap," which is akin to acer "sharp," from PIE root *ak- "be sharp, rise (out) to a point, pierce." Related: Acervated; acervating; acerval; acervative; acervuline "occurring in clusters; clustered" (by 1859).

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acervulus (n.)

"brain-sand" (anatomical), 1806, medical Latin, literally "little heap," diminutive of Latin acervus "heap," which is akin to acer "sharp" (from PIE root *ak- "be sharp, rise (out) to a point, pierce").

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hoarder (n.)

Old English hordere "treasurer," from hoard (n.). As "one who gathers and keeps a stock of something," c. 1500, from hoard (v.). In the negative/disapproving sense of "morbidly overzealous junk collector" by 1964.

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bing (n.)
"heap or pile," 1510s, from Old Norse bingr "heap." Also used from early 14c. as a word for bin, perhaps from notion of "place where things are piled."
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dunghill (n.)

"a heap of dung," early 14c., from dung (n.) + hill (n.).

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pile-up (n.)

"multi-vehicle crash," 1929, from verbal phrase pile up "to heap up" (c. 1400), which is attested from 1849 as "to accumulate," 1899 as "to wreck in a heap" (see pile (v.)).

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amass (v.)
late 15c., "to heap up for oneself," from Old French amasser "bring together, assemble, accumulate" (12c.), from à "to" (see ad-) + masser, from masse "lump, heap, pile" (from PIE root *mag- "to knead, fashion, fit"). Related: Amassed; amassing; amassable.
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