Etymology
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sap (n.1)

"juice or fluid which circulates in plants, the blood of plant life," Middle English sap, from Old English sæp, from Proto-Germanic *sapam (source also of Middle Low German, Middle Dutch, Dutch sap, Old High German saf, and, with unetymological -t, German Saft "juice"). This is reconstructed to be from PIE root *sab- "juice, fluid" (source also of Sanskrit sabar- "sap, milk, nectar," Irish sug, Russian soku "sap," Lithuanian sakas "tree-gum"). As a verb meaning "to drain the sap from," by 1725.

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OJ 
slang abbreviation of orange juice, attested by 1963.
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milkweed (n.)
1590s, from milk (n.) + weed (n.); used in reference to various plants whose juice resembles milk.
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chyle (n.)

"milky fluid formed during the process of digestion," 1540s, from Late Latin chylus "the extracted juice of a plant," from Greek khylos "juice" (of plants, animals, etc.), from stem of khein "to pour, gush forth," from PIE *ghus-mo-, from root *gheu- "to pour, pour a libation." Compare also chyme.

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succulent (adj.)
c. 1600, from French succulent (16c.), from Latin succulentus "having juice, juicy," from succus "juice, sap;" related to sugere "to suck," and possibly cognate with Old English socian "to soak," sucan "to suck" (see sup (v.2)). The noun meaning "plant with juicy tissues" is from 1825.
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soma (n.)
name of an intoxicant used in ancient Vedic ritual, prepared from the juice of some East Indian plant, 1785, from Sanskrit soma, from PIE *seu- "juice," from root *seue- (2) "to take liquid" (see sup (v.2)). In "Brave New World" (1932), the name of a state-dispensed narcotic producing euphoria and hallucination.
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orangeade (n.)

"drink made from orange juice and sweetened water," 1706, from French, from orange + ending from lemonade.

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watermelon (n.)
1610s, from water (n.1) + melon. So called for being full of thin juice. Compare French melon d'eau.
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pog (n.)

disc used in playing a game said to have originated in Hawaii and popular in U.S. during the mid-1990s; said to be from the name of a brand of juice-drink made in Hawaii since about 1971, the milk caps from the bottles of it being used to play the game originally. The juice-drink name is said to be an acronym from passionfruit, orange, and guava, the ingredients of the drink.

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Margarita (n.)

cocktail made with tequila and citrus fruit juice, 1963, from the fem. proper name, the Spanish form of Margaret. Earlier in English it meant "a Spanish wine" (1920).

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