Etymology
Advertisement
rejoice (v.)

c. 1300, rejoisen, "to own (goods, property), possess, enjoy the possession of, have the fruition of," from Old French rejoiss-, present participle stem of rejoir, resjoir "gladden, rejoice," from re-, which here is of obscure signification, perhaps an intensive (see re-), + joir "be glad," from Latin gaudere "rejoice" (see joy).

From mid-14c. in a transitive sense of "make joyful, gladden." Intransitive meaning "be full of joy" is recorded from late 14c. Middle English also used simple verb joy "to feel gladness; experience joy in a high degree" (mid-13c.) and rejoy (early 14c.). Also in 15c.-16c. "to have (someone) as husband or wife, to have for oneself and enjoy." To rejoice in "be glad about, delight in" is from late 14c. Related: Rejoiced; rejoicing.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
enjoy (v.)
late 14c., "rejoice, be glad" (intransitive), from stem of Old French enjoir "to give joy, rejoice, take delight in," from en- "make" (see en- (1)) + joir "enjoy," from Latin gaudere "rejoice" (see joy); Sense of "have the use or benefit of" first recorded early 15c. (replacing Old English brucan, for which see brook (v.)).

Transitive meaning "take pleasure in" is mid-15c. In modern use it has a tendency to lose its connection with pleasure: newspaper photo captions say someone enjoys an ice cream cone, etc., when all she is doing is eating it, and Wright's "English Dialect Dictionary" (1900) reports widespread use in north and west England of the phrase to enjoy bad health for one who has ailments. Meaning "have sexual relations with" (a woman) is from 1590s. Related: Enjoyed; enjoys; enjoying. To enjoy oneself "feel pleasure or satisfaction in one's mind" attested by 1708.
Related entries & more 
jolly (adj.)

c. 1300 (late 13c. as a surname, late 14c. as the name of a dog), "merry, cheerful, naturally of a happy disposition; comical; suggesting joy or merriment," from Old French jolif "festive, merry; amorous; pretty" (12c., Modern French joli "pretty, nice"), a word of uncertain origin. It has an apparent cognate in Italian giulivo "merry, pleasant."

It is often suggested that the word is ultimately Germanic, from a source akin to Old Norse jol "a winter feast" (see yule). OED, however, finds this "extremely doubtful," based on "historic and phonetic difficulties." Perhaps the French word is from Latin gaudere "to rejoice," from PIE *gau- "to rejoice" (see joy).

Meaning "great, remarkable, uncommon" is from 1540s, hence its use as a general intensifier in expressions of admiration. Colloquial meaning "somewhat drunk" is from 1650s. As an adverb from early 15c., "stoutly, boldly." For loss of -f, compare tardy, hasty. Related: Jolliness. Broader Middle English senses, mostly now lost, include "vigorous, strong, youthful" (c. 1300); "amorous; lecherous; ready to mate; in heat" (c. 1300); "pleasing, beautiful, handsome; noble-looking; handsomely dressed" (c. 1300); playful, frisky (mid-14c.); "arrogant, overweening, foolish" (mid-14c.).

Related entries & more 
gratulation (n.)

late 15c., gratulacyon "expression of thanks," from Latin gratulationem (nominative gratulatio) "a manifestation of joy, wishing joy, rejoicing," from past-participle stem of gratulari "give thanks, show joy," from gratus "agreeable" (from suffixed form of PIE root *gwere- (2) "to favor").

Related entries & more 
jubilation (n.)

late 14c., from Old French jubilacion "jubilation, rejoicing," and directly from Late Latin iubilationem (nominative iubilatio) "a shouting for joy," noun of action from past-participle stem of iubilare "to let out whoops, shout for joy" (see jubilant).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
acclaim (n.)
"act of acclaiming, a shout of joy," 1667 (in Milton), from acclaim (v.).
Related entries & more 
schadenfreude (n.)

"malicious joy in the misfortunes of others," 1922 as a word in English, German Schadenfreude, literally "damage-joy," from schaden "damage, harm, injury" (see scathe) + freude "joy," from Old High German frewida "joy," from fro "happy," literally "hopping for joy" (from Proto-Germanic *frawa-; see frolic).

What a fearful thing is it that any language should have a word expressive of the pleasure which men feel at the calamities of others; for the existence of the word bears testimony to the existence of the thing. And yet in more than one such a word is found. [Richard C. Trench, "On the Study of Words," 1852]
Related entries & more 
gladness (n.)
Old English glædnes "joy; good nature;" see glad (adj.) + -ness.
Related entries & more 
congratulation (n.)

mid-15c., from Latin congratulationem (nominative congratulatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of congratulari "wish joy," from com "together, with" (see com-) + gratulari "give thanks, show joy," from gratus "agreeable" (from suffixed form of PIE root *gwere- (2) "to favor").

Related entries & more 
jubilant (adj.)
1660s (Milton), from Latin iubilantem (nominative iubilans), present participle of iubilare "to let out whoops," in Christian writers, "to shout for joy," related to iubilum "wild shout," from Proto-Italic *iu, an exclamation of joy that probably was in Proto-Indo-European (cognates: Greek iu, an interjection of amazement, iuge "crying;" Middle High German ju, juch, an exclamation of joy; Dutch juichen, Old Norse yla, English yowl). With ending as in sibilant. Related: Jubilantly.
Related entries & more 

Page 2