Etymology
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itinerary (n.)
mid-15c., "route of travel," from Late Latin itinerarium "account of a journey, description of a route of travel, road-book," noun use of neuter of itinerarius "of a journey," from Latin itineris "a journey," from ire "go" (from PIE root *ei- "to go"). By early 15c. it meant "record of a journey;" extended sense "sketch of a proposed route, list of places to be included in a journey" is from 1856.
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foy (n.)
"entertainment given by one about to make a journey," Scottish and dialectal, late 15c., of uncertain origin, perhaps ultimately from French voie "way, journey" (see voyage (n.)).
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safari (n.)

1890 (attested from 1860 as a foreign word), "an expedition over country in East Africa lasting days or weeks," especially for hunting, from Swahili, "journey, expedition," from Arabic, literally "referring to a journey," from safar "journey" (which itself is attested in English as a foreign word from 1858). Used from 1920s of various articles of clothing suitable for safaris.

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pilgrimage (n.)

late 13c., pelrimage, "act of journeying through a strange country to a holy place, long journey undertaken by a pilgrim;" from pilgrim + -age and also from Anglo-French pilrymage, Old French pelrimage, pelerinage "pilgrimage, distant journey, crusade," from peleriner "to go on a pilgrimage." Modern spelling is from early 14c. Figurative sense of "the journey of life" is by mid-14c.

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peregrination (n.)

early 15c., peregrinacioun, "a journey, pilgrimage," hence, later, "roaming or wandering about in general," from Old French peregrination "pilgrimage, long absence" (12c.) or directly from Latin peregrinationem (nominative peregrinatio) "a journey, a sojourn abroad," noun of action from past-participle stem of peregrinari "to journey or travel abroad," figuratively "to roam about, wander," from peregrinus "from foreign parts, foreigner," from peregre (adv.) "abroad," properly "from abroad, found outside Roman territory," from per "away" (see per) + agri, locative of ager "field, territory, land, country" (from PIE root *agro- "field"). The earlier English word was peregrinage (mid-14c.).

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bon voyage 
1670s, French, "pleasant journey," from bon "good," (see bon) + voyage (see voyage (n.)).
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fare (n.)
Old English fær "journey, road, passage, expedition," from strong neuter of faran "to journey" (see fare (v.)); merged with faru "journey, expedition, companions, baggage," strong fem. of faran. Original sense is obsolete, except in compounds (wayfarer, sea-faring, etc.) Meaning "food provided" is c. 1200 (Old English also had the word in the sense "means of subsistence"); that of "conveyance" appears in Scottish early 15c. and led to sense of "payment for passage" (1510s). Meaning "person conveyed in a vehicle" is from 1560s.
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jaunt (n.)
1670s in modern sense of "short pleasure trip," earlier "tiresome journey" (1590s), from jaunt (v.).
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viatic (adj.)
1650s, from Latin viaticus "of or pertaining to a journey," from via "way" (see via) + -al (1). Related: Viatical (1782).
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stagecoach (n.)
also stage-coach, 1650s, from stage (n.) in a sense of "division of a journey without stopping for rest" (c. 1600) + coach (n.).
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