Etymology
Advertisement
enjoin (v.)

c. 1200, engoinen, "to prescribe, impose" (penance, etc.), from stem of Old French enjoindre (12c.) "impose (on), inflict; subject to; assign (to)," from Latin iniungere "to join, fasten, attach;" figuratively "to inflict, to attack, impose," from in- "on" (from PIE root *en "in") + iungere "to join together" (from nasalized form of PIE root *yeug- "to join"). Related: Enjoined; enjoining.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
joint (n.)

c. 1300, "an (anatomical) joint, a part of a body where two bones meet and move in contact with one another, the structure that holds such bones together," from Old French joint "joint of the body" (12c.), from Latin iunctus "united, connected, associated," past participle of iungere "to join together," from nasalized form of PIE root *yeug- "to join." Related: Joints.

In general use from late 14c., of insect and plant parts, also "that which joins two components of an artificial structure." In butchering, "cut of meat on the bone," early 15c. Slang or cant meaning of "place, building, establishment" (especially one where persons meet for shady activities) first recorded 1877; earlier it was used in an Anglo-Irish context (1821), perhaps on the notion of a private side-room, one "joined" to a main room. In late 19c. U.S. use especially "an opium-smoking den" (1883).

Meaning "marijuana cigarette" (1938) is perhaps from notion of something often smoked in common, but there are other possibilities; earlier joint in drug slang meant "hypodermic outfit" (1935). Meaning "prison" is attested from 1953 but probably is older. Out of joint in the figurative sense "disordered, confused, gone wrong" is from early 15c. (literally, of bone displacement, late 14c.). Joint-stock "of or pertaining to holding stock in shares" is from 1610s.

Related entries & more 
conjoint (adj.)

"united, connected, associated," late 14c., from Old French conjoint, past participle of conjoindre "to meet, come together" (12c.), from Latin coniungere "to join together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + iungere "to join together" (from nasalized form of PIE root *yeug- "to join." Related: Conjointly (early 14c.).

Related entries & more 
conjugation (n.)

mid-15c., "the inflection of a verb in all its different forms; a class of verbs similarly conjugated," from Latin coniugationem (nominative coniugatio), literally "a combining, connecting," noun of action from past-participle stem of coniugare "to join together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + iugare "to join," from iugum "yoke" (from PIE root *yeug- "to join"). Meaning "act of uniting or combining" is from c. 1600.

Related entries & more 
glue (v.)

"join or fasten with glue," late 14c., from Old French gluer, gluier "smear with glue; join together," from glu "glue, birdlime" (see glue (n.)). Related: Glued; gluing.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
conjugal (adj.)

1540s, "pertaining to marriage, nuptial," also "pertaining to the relationship of husband and wife," from French conjugal (13c.), from Latin coniugalis "relating to marriage," from coniunx (genitive coniugis) "spouse," which is related to coniugare "to join together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + iugare "to join," from iugum "yoke" (from PIE root *yeug- "to join"). Related: Conjugacy; conjugality.

Related entries & more 
conjuncture (n.)

c. 1600, "a combining or joining together," from French conjoncture (16c.), from Medieval Latin coniunctura, from Latin coniunctus, past participle of coniugere "to join together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + iungere "to join together" (from nasalized form of PIE root *yeug- "to join"). Meaning "combination of circumstances," especially "a critical state of affairs," is from 1610s.

Related entries & more 
injunction (n.)

early 15c., from Late Latin iniunctionem (nominative iniunctio) "a command," noun of action from past participle stem of Latin iniungere "impose, inflict, bring upon," literally "attach to," from in- "on" (from PIE root *en "in") + iungere "to join together," from nasalized form of PIE root *yeug- "to join."

Related entries & more 
disjuncture (n.)
Origin and meaning of disjuncture

"act of disjointing, state of being disjointed," c. 1400, originally surgical, "dislocation," from Medieval Latin disjunctura, from Latin disiungere from dis- (see dis-) + iungere "to join together," from nasalized form of PIE root *yeug- "to join." Figurative use from 1680s.

Related entries & more 
rejoin (v.2)

"to say in answer to a reply or later remark," mid-15c., a legal term, "answer a reply, reply a second time" (to a charge or complaint), from Old French rejoin-, stem of rejoindre "to answer to a legal charge," from Old French re- "back" (see re-) + joindre "to join, connect, unite," from Latin iungere "to join together, unite, yoke" (from nasalized form of PIE root *yeug- "to join").

Related entries & more 

Page 2