Etymology
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DJ (n.)

also dee-jay, abbreviation of disk-jockey (see disk), attested by 1961.

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jock (n.)

1952, short for jockstrap "supporter of the male genital organs," which also meant, in slang, "athletic male." Jock with the meaning "an athletic man" is from 1963, American English slang. A jockette (1948) originally was a female disk jockey, then a female jockey (1969), then an athletic female (1979).

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clubbable (adj.)

"having qualities that make one fit to be a member of a social club," 1783, from club (n.) + -able.

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middleweight (n.)

also middle-weight, "boxer or jockey of intermediate weight" (between a lightweight and a heavyweight), 1842, from middle (adj.) + weight (n.).

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clubbed (adj.)

late 14c., "shaped like a club, thick at the end," from club (n.). Specifically of defects of the foot by c. 1500; meaning "formed into a club" is from 1620s.

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Soroptimist 

international society of business women and women executives, first club formed 1921 in Oakland, Calif., U.S., from stem of sorority + optimist, probably after the Optimist Club.

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billy (n.)

"club," 1848, American English, originally burglars' slang for "crowbar." The meaning "policeman's club" is recorded by 1856, probably from nickname of William, applied to various objects (compare jack, jimmy, jenny). But compare French bille "a short, stout stick" (see billet (n.1)).

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clubby (adj.)

"of a social disposition," 1859, from club (n.) in the associative sense + -y (2). Related: Clubbily; clubbiness.

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kit-cat (n.)

name of a club founded by Whig politicians in London (Addison and Steele were members), 1703; so called from Christopher ("Kit") Catling, or a name similar to it, a tavernkeeper or pastry cook in London, in whose property the club first met. Hence "a size of portrait less than half length in which a hand may be shown" (1754), supposedly is because the dining room in which portraits of club members hung was too low for half-length portraits.

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niblick (n.)

"small, narrow-headed iron golf club," used to get the ball out of ruts or other bad places, 1857, of obscure origin.

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