Etymology
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squirt (n.)
late 14c., "diarrhea," from squirt (v.). Meaning "jet of liquid" is from 1620s. Meaning "a whipper-snapper" is from 1839.
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seacoal (n.)

also sea-coal, old name for "mineral coal, fossil coal" (as opposed to charcoal), late 13c., secol; earlier, in Old English, it meant "jet," which chiefly was found washed ashore by the sea. See sea + coal (n.). The coal perhaps was so called for its resemblance to jet, or because it was first dug from beds exposed by wave erosion. As it became the predominant type used, the prefix was dropped.

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squirt (v.)
late 15c., squyrten "to spit" (intransitive), of uncertain origin, probably imitative. Transitive sense "cause to issue in a sudden jet or stream" is from 1580s. Related: Squirted; squirting. Squirt-gun attested from 1803.
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blow-pipe (n.)
1680s, "instrument to carry a current of air or gas to a flame, jet, etc.;" 1825 as a type of weapon, "blow-gun;" from blow (v.1) + pipe (n.1).
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Jacuzzi (n.)

type of whirlpool bath, 1961, U.S. proprietary name, from Jacuzzi Brothers, then headquartered in California, who earlier made jet pumps for motorboats. The family immigrated from Friuli in northern Italy.

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ejection (n.)

1560s, from French ejection and directly from Latin eiectionem (nominative eiectio) "a casting out, banishment, exile," noun of action from past-participle stem of eicere (see eject). The jet pilot's ejection seat (also ejector seat) is from 1945.

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girandole (n.)
1630s, a type of fireworks; 1769 as a branched holder for candles; 1825 as a type of earring or pendant, from French girandole, from Italian girandola, diminutive of giranda "a revolving jet," from Latin gyrandus, gerundive of gyrare "to turn round in a circle, revolve" (see gyration). Also in English in the Italian form.
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jut (v.1)

"to protrude, extend forward beyond the main body," mid-15c., corruption of obsolete verb jet, from Old French jeter "to throw," from Latin iacēre "to lie, rest," related to iacere "to throw" (from PIE root *ye- "to throw, impel"). Related: Jutted; jutting. As a noun, "a jutting out, a projecting point" from 1786.

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douche (n.)

1766, "jet of water or current applied to some part of the body," from French douche (16c.), from Italian doccia "shower," from docciare "to spray," from Latin ductionem "a leading" (from ducere "to lead," from PIE root *deuk- "to lead"). The sense in reference to vaginal cleansing is by 1833. The verb is attested by 1838. Related: Douched; douching.

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jess (n.)
leg-strap used in hawking and falconry, mid-14c., from Old French jes "straps fastened round the legs of a falcon," plural of jet, literally "a cast of a hawk, a throw, a throwing," from Latin iactus "a throw, a cast," from iacere "to throw, cast" (from PIE root *ye- "to throw, impel"). Related: Jesses.
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