Etymology
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razzmatazz (n.)

1894, a slang word but the earliest uses are unclear as to sense, perhaps a varied reduplication of jazz (n.). The word had early associations with jazz, which by the 1930s had become disparaging, "old-fashioned jazz," especially in contrast to swing.

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hepcat (n.)

also hep-cat, "addict of swing music," more generally, "one who is in the know and knows it," 1937, from hep (1) "aware, up-to-date" in jazz slang + cat (n.) in the slang sense "jazz enthusiast."

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back-beat (n.)
1928, in jazz, from back (adj.) + beat (n.).
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trad (adj.)
1956, slang shortening of traditional jazz. Its general slang use for "traditional" is recorded from 1963.
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icky (adj.)
1935, American English, probably from icky-boo (c. 1920) "sickly, nauseated," which probably is a baby talk elaboration of sick (adj.). Originally a swing lover's term for more sentimental jazz music; in general use, "sticky and repulsive," from 1938. Also a noun, "person with conventional taste in jazz," 1937.
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gone (adj.)
"hopeless, beyond recovery," 1590s, past-participle adjective from go (v.). In jazz slang as a superlative from 1946.
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stomp (v.)
1803, variant of stamp. Related: Stomped; stomping. Noun meaning "lively social dance" is recorded from 1912 in jazz slang.
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skiffle (n.)
style of U.K. pop music, 1957, from U.S. slang meaning "type of jazz played on improvised instruments" (1926), of unknown origin.
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scat (n.1)
"nonsense patter sung to jazz," 1926, probably of imitative origin, from one of the syllables used. As a verb, 1935, from the noun. Related: Scatting.
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far-out (adj.)
also far out, 1887, "remote, distant;" from adverbial phrase, from far (adv.) + out (adv.). Slang sense of "excellent, wonderful," is from 1954, originally in jazz talk.
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