Etymology
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suss (v.)

"to figure out, investigate and discover," 1966, earlier "to suspect" (1953, police jargon), a slang shortening of suspect (v.). Related: Sussed.

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love-hate (adj.)

expressing ambivalent and strong feelings toward someone or something, 1935, originally in the jargon of psychology, from love + hate.

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A-OK 

1961, said to be an abbreviation of all (systems) OK; popularized in the jargon of U.S. astronauts. See OK.

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sox (n.)

altered plural of sock (n.1), 1905, originally in commercial jargon.

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zircon (n.)

1794, circon, also jargon, new name given in chemistry to jacinth, from German Zirkon (Klaproth, 1789), which probably is from 18c. French jargon, a vague mineral word used of high-quality diamond-like gemstones; it has been traced to Medieval Latin jargonce, which is of uncertain origin. Compare Italian giargone, from the same source.

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zoot suit (n.)

1942, American English slang, the first element probably a nonsense reduplication of suit (compare reet pleat, drape shape from the same jargon).

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perp (n.)

1940s American English police jargon shortening of perpetrator (as in perp walk).

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skip (n.2)

short for skipper (n.1), 1830, originally in sports jargon (curling).

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psychobabble (n.)

"jargon based on the concepts and terminology of psychology," 1976, from psycho- (representing psychology) + babble (n.). Earlier was psychologese (1961).

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authoritarianism (n.)

"the practice, system, doctrines, etc. of authoritarians," 1883; see authoritarian + -ism. Early use was mostly in communist jargon.

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