Etymology
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Peck's bad boy 

"unruly or mischievous child," 1883, from fictional character created by George Wilbur Peck (1840-1916).

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weltanschauung (n.)
1868 (William James), from German Weltanschauung, from welt "world" (see world) + anschauung "perception" (related to English show).
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ecosystem (n.)
1935; see eco- + system. Perhaps coined by English ecologist Sir Arthur George Tansley (1871-1955).
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pancreatitis (n.)

"inflammation of the pancreas," 1824 (Dr. George Pearson Dawson), medical Latin, from combining form of pancreas + -itis "inflammation." Related: Pancreatitic.

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Huntington's chorea 
also Huntington's disease, 1889, named for U.S. neurologist George Huntington (1851-1916), who described it in 1872.
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New Jersey 
named 1664 by one of the proprietors, Sir George Carteret, for his home, the Channel island of Jersey. Jersey girl attested from 1770.
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Hanoverian (adj.)
"pertaining to or connected with the former electorate of Hanover in northern Germany, from the German city of Hanover (German Hannover), literally "on the high ridge," from Middle Low German hoch "high" + over, cognate with Old English ofer "flat-topped ridge." The modern royal family of Great Britain is descended from Electoress Sophia of Hannover, grand-daughter of James I of England, whose heirs received the British crown in 1701 (nearer heirs being set aside as Roman Catholics). The first was George I. They were joint rulers of Britain and Hannover until the accession of Victoria (1837) who was excluded from Hannover by Salic Law. Hanover in English also was a euphemism for "Hell."
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joule (n.)
unit of electrical energy, 1882, coined in recognition of British physicist James P. Joule (1818-1889). The surname is a variant of Joel. Related: Joulemeter.
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Shavian (adj.)

1903, "in the style or manner of George Bernard Shaw" (1856-1950), from the Latinized form of his surname. An earlier unlatinized form was Shawian (1894).

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