Etymology
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transeunt (adj.)
variant of transient (adj.), usually in a sense of "operating beyond or outside itself" (opposite of immanent).
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tortellini (n.)
1937, from Italian, plural of tortellino, diminutive of tortello "cake, fritter," itself a diminutive of torta (see torte).
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self-regulating (adj.)

"regulating itself," 1837, from self- + present participle of regulate (v.). Related: Self-regulated; self-regulation.

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abstractly (adv.)
late 14c., "by itself, absolutely, unconnected with anything else," from abstract (adj.) + -ly (2).
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self-supporting (adj.)

"maintaining oneself or itself without extraneous help," 1680s; see self- + past participle of support (v.).

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self-explanatory (adj.)

"explaining itself, obvious, bearing its meaning on the surface," 1813, from self- + explanatory. Earlier was self-explained (1725).

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huge (adj.)
mid-12c., apparently a shortening of Old French ahuge, ahoge "extremely large, enormous; mighty, powerful," itself of uncertain origin. Related: Hugeness.
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self-contained (adj.)

1590s, reserved, not sympathetic or communicative," from self- + contained (see contain). As "complete in itself," by 1828.

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rapacious (adj.)

"of a grasping habit or disposition," 1650s, from Latin rapaci-, stem of rapax "grasping," itself from stem of rapere "to seize" (see rapid) + -ous. Related: Rapaciously; rapaciousness.

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flypaper (n.)
also fly-paper, 1851 (the thing itself is said to have become commonly available in London in 1848), from fly (n.1) + paper (n.).
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