Etymology
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tombola (n.)
Italian lotto-style lottery, 1880, from Italian tombola, apparently from tombolare "to tumble, fall upside down," from a Germanic source (see tumble (v.)).
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basso 
in various musical terms borrowed from Italian, "bass, a bass voice," from Italian basso, from Late Latin bassus "short, low" (see base (adj.)).
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madonna (n.)

1580s, Italian title of address or courtesy, equivalent to madam; from c. 1600 as a noun, "an Italian lady," from Italian madonna, from Old Italian ma donna (Italian mia donna) "my lady," from ma "my" + donna "lady," from Latin domina "lady, mistress of the house," from Latin domus "house" (from PIE root *dem- "house, household").

Often specifically "the Virgin Mary," hence the sense of "picture or statue of the Virgin Mary," attested in English by 1640s. The U.S. singer/dancer (full name Madonna Louise Ciccone, b. 1958) attained to pop stardom in the fall of 1984.

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carabinieri (n.)
"Italian police" (plural), 1847, from Italian carabinieri, plural of carabiniere, from French carabinier "soldier armed with a carbine," from carabine (see carbine).
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ritardando (adv.)

in music, "becoming gradually slower," 1811, from Italian, present participle of ritardare "to slow down," from Latin retardare "to make slow" (see retardation). The Italian plural is ritardandi.

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lira (n.)
Italian monetary unit, 1610s, from Italian lira, literally "pound," from Latin libra "pound (unit of weight);" see Libra, and compare livre. There also was a Turkish lira.
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trill (n.)
1640s, from Italian trillio, triglio "a quavering or warbling in singing," probably ultimately of imitative origin. The verb is 1660s, from Italian trillare "to quaver, trill." Related: Trilled; trilling.
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tercet (n.)
"three successive lines rhyming together," 1590s, from Italian terzetto, diminutive of terzo "third," from Latin tertius (see third). Spelling influenced by French tercet, from the Italian.
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Vespa (n.)
1950, proprietary name of an Italian make of motor scooter, first produced 1946, from Italian, literally "wasp," from Latin vespa (see wasp). Rival brand was Lambretta.
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