Etymology
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Kodiak 
Alaskan island, from Russian Kadiak, from Alutiiq (Eskimo) qikertaq "island."
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Chian (adj.)
"pertaining to the Greek island of Chios," 1630s. The island name is of uncertain origin, perhaps related to Greek khion "snow."
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Nauru 

island in the western Pacific, by 1896, of unknown origin; formerly known as Pleasant Island (1798). Related: Nauruan (1918).

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Ithaca 
western Greek Island, legendary home of Odysseus; the first element is perhaps Phoenician i "island;" the rest is unknown. Related: Ithacan.
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Madagascar 

large island lying to the east of and near Africa, from Mogadishu, the name of the city in Somalia, due to an error by Marco Polo in reading Arabic, whereby he thought the name was that of the island. There is no indigenous name for the whole island. Related: Madagascan; Madagascarian; Madagascarene.

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Samothrace 

Aegean island, from Samos + Thrace, representing the sources of two waves of settlers who came to the island in ancient times. Related: Samothracian.

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Puerto Rico 

island in the Greater Antilles group of the West Indies, Spanish, literally "rich harbor;" see port (n.1) + rich (adj.). The name was given in 1493 by Christopher Columbus to the large bay on the north side of the island; he called the island itself San Juan. Over time the name of the bay became the name of the island and the name of the island was taken by the town that grew up at the bay. Often spelled Porto Rico in 19c.; the current spelling was made official in 1932.

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Bornholm 
island in the southern Baltic, from Old Danish Burgundarholm, from Burgundar "the Burgundians" (see Burgundy) + holm "island" (see holm). The Burgundians migrated from there to France 5c.
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java (n.)
"coffee," 1850, short for Java coffee (1787), originally a kind of coffee grown on Java and nearby islands of modern Indonesia. By early 20c. it meant coffee generally. The island name is shortened from Sanskrit Yavadvipa "Island of Barley," from yava "barley" + dvipa "island." Related: Javan (c. 1600); Javanese (1704).
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peninsula (n.)

"piece of land almost surrounded by water but connected with a mainland by a neck or isthmus," 1530s, from Latin paeninsula "a peninsula," literally "almost an island," from pæne "nearly, almost, practically," which is of uncertain origin, + insula "island" (see isle). In 16c. sometimes Englished as demie island.

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