Etymology
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exertion (n.)

1660s, "act of exerting," from exert + -ion. Meaning "vigorous action or effort" is from 1777.

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-ion 

word-forming element attached to verbs, making nouns of state, condition, or action, from French -ion or directly from Latin -ionem (nominative -io, genitive -ionis), common suffix forming abstract nouns from verbs.

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fellation (n.)

1887, noun of action formed classically from the past-participle stem of Latin fellare "to suck" (see fellatio + -ion).

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electron (n.)

coined 1891 by Irish physicist George J. Stoney (1826-1911) from electric + -on, as in ion (q.v.). Electron microscope (1932) translates German Elektronenmikroskop.

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syndication (n.)

1887, "act of forming a syndicate," from syndicate (n.) + -ion. Sense of "publication, broadcast, or ownership by a syndicate" is attested from 1925.

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ionize (v.)

1896, from ion + -ize. Related: Ionized; ionizing. Unrelated to Ionize "to make Ionic in form or fact" (1816), for which see Ionian.

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motivation (n.)

1873, "act or process of furnishing with an incentive or inducement to action;" see motivate + -ion. Perhaps borrowed from German, where motivation is attested by 1854. Psychological use, "inner or social stimulus for an action," is from 1904.

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automation (n.)

1948, in the manufacturing sense, "the large-scale use of automatic equipment in production," coined by Ford Motor Co. Vice President Delmar S. Harder, from automatic (adj.) + -ion. Earlier (1838) was automatism, which meant "quality of being automatic" in the classical sense.

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cation (n.)

"positively charged ion," 1834, from Latinized form of Greek kation "going down," neuter present participle of katienai "to go down," from kata "down" (see cata-) + ienai "to go" (from PIE root *ei- "to go"). Proposed by the Rev. William Whewell, English polymath, and published by English physicist Michael Faraday. Compare ion.

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-tion 

syllable formed when the word-forming element -ion (from Latin -io) is fixed to a base or to another suffix ending in -t or -te. In Middle English, in words via Old French, it often was -cion (in coercion and suspicion, however, the -c- belongs to the base).

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