Etymology
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crystallize (v.)

1590s, "convert into crystal;" 1660s "form into crystals;" from crystal + -ize. Intransitive sense of "be converted into crystals" is from 1640s. Figurative use, of opinions, love, etc., that are at first indeterminate, "assume a definite form and fixity," is from 1660s. Related: Crystallized; crystallizing.

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institutionalize (v.)

"to put into institutional life" (usually deprecatory), 1897; see institution. Earlier (1860) it meant "to make into an institution" and "to adjust to life in an institution" (1893). Related: Institutionalized.

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induct (v.)

late 14c., "introduce, initiate, especially into office or employment," from Latin inductus, past participle of inducere "to lead into, introduce" (see induce). Originally of church offices; sense of "draft into military service" is 1917 in American English. Related: Inducted; inducting.

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barge (v.)

"to journey by barge," 1590s, from barge (n.). The form barge into and the sense of "crash heavily into," in reference to the rough handling of barges, are attested by 1898. Related: Barged; barging.

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mystagogy 

"interpretation of mysteries; the practice of a mystagogue," 1570s, from French mystagogie, from Latin mystagogia, from Greek mystagōgia "initiation into the mysteries," from mystagōgos "one who initiates into the mysteries" (see mystagogue). Related: Mystagoguery (1927).

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dock (v.2)

 "to bring or place (a ship) into a dock," 1510s, from dock (n.1). Intransitive sense of "to come into a dock" is by 1892. Of spaceships, by 1951. Related: Docked; docking

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obsolesce (v.)

"fall into disuse, grow obsolete," 1801, from Latin obsolescere "to grow old, wear out, lose value, become obsolete," inchoative of obsolere "fall into disuse" (see obsolete). Related: Obsolesced; obsolescing.

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intubate (v.)

1610s, "to form into tubes," from in- (2) "in" + Latin tuba "tube" (see tuba) + -ate (2). Medical sense is from 1887. Related: Intubated. Intubation "act of inserting a tube" (into an orifice) is from 1885.

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carbonate (v.)

1805, "form into a carbonate," from carbonate (n.) by influence of French carbonater "transform into a carbonate." The meaning "impregnate with carbonic acid gas (i.e. carbon dioxide)" is from 1850s. Related: Carbonated; carbonating.

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code (v.)

"to put into code," 1815, from code (n.). Specifically "to put into computer code" from 1947. Intransitive sense "write computer code" is by 1987. Related: Coded; coding.

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