Etymology
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irrupt (v.)
"to break into," 1805 (implied in irrupted), back-formation from irruption or else from Latin irruptus, past participle of irrumpere "to break in, burst into."
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barge (v.)
"to journey by barge," 1590s, from barge (n.). The form barge into and the sense "crash heavily into," in reference to the rough handling of barges, attested by 1898. Related: Barged; barging.
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induct (v.)
late 14c., "introduce, initiate, especially into office or employment," from Latin inductus, past participle of inducere "to lead into, introduce" (see induce). Originally of church offices; sense of "draft into military service" is 1917 in American English. Related: Inducted; inducting.
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mystagogy 

"interpretation of mysteries; the practice of a mystagogue," 1570s, from French mystagogie, from Latin mystagogia, from Greek mystagōgia "initiation into the mysteries," from mystagōgos "one who initiates into the mysteries" (see mystagogue). Related: Mystagoguery (1927).

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crystallize (v.)

1590s, "convert into crystal;" 1660s "form into crystals;" from crystal + -ize. Intransitive sense of "be converted into crystals" is from 1640s. Figurative use, of opinions, love, etc., that are at first indeterminate, "assume a definite form and fixity," is from 1660s. Related: Crystallized; crystallizing.

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obsolesce (v.)

"fall into disuse, grow obsolete," 1801, from Latin obsolescere "to grow old, wear out, lose value, become obsolete," inchoative of obsolere "fall into disuse" (see obsolete). Related: Obsolesced; obsolescing.

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intubate (v.)
1610s, "to form into tubes," from in- (2) "in" + Latin tuba "tube" (see tuba) + -ate (2). Medical sense is from 1887. Related: Intubated. Intubation "act of inserting a tube" (into an orifice) is from 1885.
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carbonate (v.)
1805, "to form into a carbonate," from carbonate (n.) by influence of French carbonater "transform into a carbonate." Meaning "to impregnate with carbonic acid gas (i.e. carbon dioxide)" is from 1850s. Related: Carbonated; carbonating.
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intolerance (n.)
1765, "unwillingness to endure a differing opinion or belief," from Latin intolerantia "impatience; unendurableness, insufferableness; insolence," from intolerantem "impatient, intolerant" (see intolerant). There is an isolated use from c. 1500, with an apparent sense of "unwillingness." Especially of religious matters through mid-19c. Now-obsolete intolerancy was used in same sense from 1620s; intoleration from 1610s. Meaning "incapacity to bear or endure" is by 1844.
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intonation (n.)
1610s, "opening phrase of a melody," from French intonation (14c.), from Medieval Latin intonationem (nominative intonatio), noun of state from past participle stem of intonare (see intone). From 1788 as "action of intoning." Meaning "modulation of the voice in speaking, utterance of tones" is from 1791.
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