Etymology
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crony (n.)

"old familiar friend, intimate companion," 1660s, chrony, Cambridge student slang, probably from Greek khronios "long-lasting," from khronos "time" (see chrono-), on the notion of "old friend" or "a contemporary."

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boudoir (n.)
"room where a lady may retire to be alone or to receive her intimate friends," 1777, from French boudoir (18c.), literally "pouting room," from bouder "to pout, sulk," which, like pout, probably ultimately is imitative of puffing.
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sociable (adj.)

1550s, "enjoying the company of others," from French sociable (16c.) and directly from Latin sociabilis "close, intimate, easily united," from sociare "to join, unite," from socius "companion, ally," from PIE *sokw-yo-, suffixed form of root *sekw- (1) "to follow."

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boon (adj.)
in boon companion "convivial friend, close intimate" (1560s), the only real survival of Middle English boon "good" (early 14c.), from Old French bon (see bon), from Latin bonus "good" (see bonus). Probably influenced by boon (n.).
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familiarity (n.)
c. 1200, "closeness of personal association, intimacy," from Old French familiarite and directly from Latin familiaritatem (nominative familiaritas) "intimacy, friendship, close acquaintance," from familiaris "friendly, intimate" (see familiar). Meaning "undue intimacy" is from late 14c. That of "state of being habitually acquainted" is from c. 1600.
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fraternization (n.)
1792, "act of uniting as brothers," noun of action from fraternize on model of French fraternisation. In reference to friendly relations between occupying soldiers and occupied civilians, from 1851; in reference to intimate relations as a violation of military discipline from 1944 (see fraternize).
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chum (n.1)

"friend, intimate companion," 1680s, originally university slang for "roommate," an alternative spelling of cham, short for chamber(mate); the formation is typical of the late-17c. fondness for clipped words. Among derived forms used 19c. were chumship; chummery "shared bachelor quarters," chummage "system of quartering more than one to a room."

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continuum (n.)

1640s, "a continuous spread or extension, a connection of elements as intimate as that of the instants of time," from Latin continuum "a continuous thing," neuter of continuus "joining, connecting with something; following one after another," from continere (intransitive) "to be uninterrupted," literally "to hang together" (see contain). The plural is continua.

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privy (adj.)

early 13c., "secret, concealed, not made known in public;" c. 1300, of places, "secluded," from Old French privé "friendly, intimate; a private place," from Latin privatus "private, personal" (see private (adj.)). Meaning "participating in (a secret)" (usually with to) is attested from late 14c. Related: Privily. Privy Council is from c. 1300 in a general sense; specifically of the British government, first attested late 14c. (with French word order) as consaile priue. Privy member "organ of sex" is from late 13c.

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liaison (n.)

1640s, originally in English as a cookery term for a thickening agent for sauces, from French liaison "a union, a binding together" (13c.), from Late Latin ligationem (nominative ligatio) "a binding," from past participle stem of Latin ligare "to bind" (from PIE root *leig- "to tie, bind").

Sense of "intimate relations" (especially between lovers) is from 1806. Military sense of "cooperation between branches, allies, etc." is from 1816. The meaning "one who is concerned with liaison of units, etc." is short for liaison officer (1915).

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