Etymology
Advertisement
viscera (n.)
"inner organs of the body," 1650s, from Latin viscera, plural of viscus "internal organ," of unknown origin.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
hollowness (n.)
late 14c., "cave, cavern; internal empty space;" mid-15c., "condition of being hollow," from hollow (adj.) + -ness.
Related entries & more 
supercharge (v.)
1919, originally of internal combustion engines, from super- + charge (v.). Related: Supercharged (1876); supercharger; supercharging.
Related entries & more 
Wankel (n.)
type of rotary internal combustion engine, 1961, from name of German engineer Felix Wankel (1902-1988).
Related entries & more 
Schutzstaffel 
internal security force of Nazi Germany, 1930, German, literally "defense squadron." Better known by its initials, S.S.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
visceral (adj.)

1570s, "affecting inward feelings," from French viscéral and directly from Medieval Latin visceralis "internal," from Latin viscera, plural of viscus "internal organ, inner parts of the body," of unknown origin. The bowels were regarded as the seat of emotion. The figurative sense vanished after 1640 and the literal sense is first recorded in 1794. The figurative sense was revived 1940s in arts criticism.

Related entries & more 
endo- 

word-forming element meaning "inside, within, internal," from Greek endon "in, within" (from PIE *en-do-, extended form of root *en "in").

Related entries & more 
intrinsic (adj.)

late 15c., "interior, inward, internal," from Old French intrinsèque "inner" (14c.), from Medieval Latin intrinsecus "interior, internal," from Latin intrinsecus (adv.) "inwardly, on the inside," from intra "within" (see intra-) + secus "along, alongside," from PIE *sekw-os- "following," suffixed form of root *sekw- (1) "to follow."

The form in English was conformed to words in -ic by 18c. Meaning "belonging to the nature of a thing" is from 1640s. Related: Intrinsical; intrinsically.

Related entries & more 
endocrine (adj.)
"secreting internally," 1914, from endo- + Latinized form of Greek krinein "to separate, distinguish" (from PIE root *krei- "to sieve," thus "discriminate, distinguish"). Denoting glands having an internal secretion.
Related entries & more 
put-put 

indicating the sound of a muffled internal combustion engine, 1904, imitative. Applied to various engines or objects which make such a sound.

Related entries & more 

Page 2