Etymology
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hurdy-gurdy (n.)
"droning instrument played with a crank," 1749, perhaps imitative of the sound of the instrument and influenced by c. 1500 hirdy-girdy "uproar, confusion." Originally a type of drone-lute played by turning a wheel.
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galvanometer (n.)
instrument for detecting and measuring electric current, 1801, from galvano-, used as a combining form of galvanism + -meter. Related: Galvanometric. Galvanoscope "instrument for detecting and determining the direction of electric current" is from 1832.
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embouchure (n.)
1760, in musical sense "placement of the mouth on a wind instrument," from French embouchure "river mouth, mouth of a wind instrument," from assimilated form of en- "in" (see en- (1)) + bouche "mouth" (see bouche).
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gyrostat (n.)
instrument for illustrating the dynamics of rotation, 1868, from gyro- + -stat.
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altimeter (n.)
"instrument for measuring altitudes," 1918, from alti- "high" + -meter.
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parer (n.)

1570s, "instrument for paring," agent noun from pare (v.).

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thermostat (n.)
automatic instrument for regulating temperature, 1831, from thermo- + -stat.
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astrolabe (n.)
"instrument for measuring the altitude of the sun and stars," mid-14c., from Old French astrelabe, from Medieval Latin astrolabium, from Greek astrolabos (organon) "star-taking (instrument)," from astron "star" (from PIE root *ster- (2) "star") + lambanien "to take" (see lemma).
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swatter (n.)
"instrument for swatting flies," 1906, agent noun from swat (v.).
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didgeridoo (n.)

"hollow, tubular musical instrument of Australian aborigines," 1924, Australian, of imitative origin.

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