Etymology
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inaccuracy (n.)
1701, "quality or condition of being inaccurate," from inaccurate + abstract noun suffix -cy. As "an instance of being inaccurate, that which is inaccurate," 1704.
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recombination (n.)

"an act or instance of recombining," 1791, from re- + combination, or else formed to go with recombine (v.). Specifically in reference to chromosomes by 1923.

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acknowledgement (n.)
1590s, "act of acknowledging," from acknowledge + -ment. "An early instance of -ment added to an orig. Eng. vb." [OED]. Meaning "token of due recognition" is recorded from 1610s.
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-rama 
noun suffix meaning "sight, view, spectacular display or instance of," 1824, abstracted from panorama (q.v.), ultimately from Greek horama "sight, spectacle, that which is seen."
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spittoon (n.)
also spitoon, 1811, American English, from spit (n.1) + -oon. A rare instance of a word formed in English using this suffix (octoroon is another). Replaced earlier spitting box (1680s).
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reread (v.)

also re-read, "to read again or anew," 1782, from re- "again" + read (v.). Related: Rereading. As a noun, "an instance of rereading," by 1973.

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swirl (v.)
1510s (transitive), with an isolated instance from 14c.; from swirl (n.). Intransitive sense "form in eddies, whirl in eddies" is from 1755. Related: Swirled; swirling.
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eccentricity (n.)
1540s, of planetary orbits; 1650s, of persons (an instance of eccentricity); 1794, of persons (a quality of eccentricity); from eccentric (adj.) + -ity or from Modern Latin eccentricitatem, from eccentricus. Related: Eccentricities.
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reasoning (n.)

late 14c., resouning, "exercise of the power of reason; act or process of thinking logically;" also an instance of this, a presentation of reasons or arguments; verbal noun from reason (v.).

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carry (n.)
c. 1600, "vehicle for carrying," from carry (v.). From 1880 as "the act or an act of carrying." U.S. football sense "an instance of carrying the ball" is attested by 1949.
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