Etymology
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capsid (adj.)
1889 in biology, "pertaining to capsidae," a type of insect, from Latin capsa "box" (see case (n.2)).
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frass (n.)
insect excrement, 1854, from German frasz, from root of fressen "to devour, to eat as a beast does" (see fret (v.)).
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grub (n.)
"larva of an insect," early 15c., perhaps from grub (v.) on the notion of "digging insect," or from the possibly unrelated Middle English grub "dwarfish fellow" (c. 1400). Meaning "dull drudge" is 1650s. The slang sense of "food" is first recorded 1650s, said to be from birds eating grubs, but also often linked with bub "drink."
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dore (n.)

Middle English, also dorre, "buzzing or whirring insect," from Old English dora, a word of unknown origin, perhaps imitative.

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horsefly (n.)
also horse-fly, type of insect extremely annoying to horses and cattle, late 14c., from horse (n.) + fly (n.).
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pediculosis (n.)

"lice infestation," 1809, with -osis + Latin pediculus, diminutive of pedis "a louse," said in some sources to be akin to pedere "to break wind" (see petard) on notion of "foul-smelling insect" [Watkins]. But de Vaan traces it to a PIE *pesd- "annoying insect" and compares Avestan pazdu- "beetle, maggot." Pedicule "louse" is attested in Middle English (early 15c.).

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pupate (v.)

"become a pupa, undergo transformation from a grub or larva to that of a perfect insect," 1862, from pupa + -ate (2). Related: Pupated; pupating.

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bug (v.2)
"to annoy, irritate," 1949, perhaps first in swing music slang, probably from bug (n.) and a reference to insect pests. Related: Bugged; bugging.
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imago (n.)

"final or adult stage of an insect," 1797, from Latin imago "an image, a likeness," from stem of imitari "to copy, imitate" (from PIE root *aim- "to copy"). "The name is due to the fact that such an insect, having passed through its larval stages, and having, as it were, cast off its mask or disguise, has become a true representation or image of its species." [Century Dictionary]

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intersect (n.)
"point of intersection," 1850, from intersect (v.) or from Latin intersectum, neuter past pasticiple of intersecare. Earlier (1650s) it was used for "an insect."
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