Etymology
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question (v.)

late 15c., questiounen, "to inquire, ask, seek to know," from question (n.) and from Old French questioner "ask questions, interrogate, torture" (13c.), from question (n.). Hence "to dispute, doubt," by 1530s. Transitive sense of "inquire of by asking questions" is from late 15c. Related: Questioned; questioning. Alternative verb questionize is attested from 1847.

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zetetic (adj.)
"proceeding by inquiry," 1640s, from Modern Latin zeteticus, from Greek zetetikos "searching, inquiring," from zetetos, verbal adjective of zetein "seek for, inquire into." Related: Zetetical.
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cun (v.)

"to learn to know, inquire into," from Old English cunnian "to learn to know," ultimately from the same ancient root as can (v.1) and compare con (v.3). Surviving into 17c. and perhaps later in dialects. Also compare cunning.

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quaere 

Latin imperative of quaerere "to ask, inquire" (see query (v.)). Used in English in the sense of "one may ask" (1530s) as an introduction to a question. Also used as a synonym of query (1580s).

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interrogatory (adj.)
"containing or expressing a question," 1570s, from Late Latin interrogatorius "consisting of questions," from past participle stem of Latin interrogare "to ask, question, inquire; interrogate judicially, cross-examine," from inter "between" (see inter-) + rogare "to ask, to question," apparently a figurative use of a PIE verb meaning literally "to stretch out (the hand)," from root *reg- "move in a straight line."
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disquisition (n.)

c. 1600, "subject for investigation" (a sense now obsolete), also "systematic search, formal inquiry into some problem or topic," from Latin disquisitionem (nominative disquisitio) "an inquiry, investigation," noun of action from past-participle stem of disquirere "inquire," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + quaerere "seek, ask" (see query (n.)). Sense of "a long speech, a formal dissertation" first recorded 1640s. Related: Disquisitional.

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interrogative (adj.)
"asking or denoting a question," c. 1500, from Late Latin interrogativus "pertaining to a question," from interrogat-, past participle stem of Latin interrogare "to ask, question, inquire; interrogate judicially, cross-examine," from inter "between" (see inter-) + rogare "to ask, to question," apparently a figurative use of a PIE verb meaning literally "to stretch out (the hand)," from root *reg- "move in a straight line." As a noun, "word implying a question," 1520s. Related: Interrogatively.
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interrogate (v.)
late 15c., a back-formation from interrogation or else from Latin interrogatus, past participle of interrogare "to ask, question, inquire; interrogate judicially, cross-examine," from inter "between" (see inter-) + rogare "to ask, to question," apparently a figurative use of a PIE verb meaning literally "to stretch out (the hand)," from root *reg- "move in a straight line." The Old French word was interroger (14c.) which yielded English interroge (late 15c.), now obsolete. Related: Interrogated; interrogating.
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interrogation (n.)
late 14c., "a question;" c. 1500, "a questioning; a set of questions," from Old French interrogacion "a questioning" (13c.) or directly from Latin interrogationem (nominative interrogatio) "a question; questioning; judicial inquiry," noun of action from past participle stem of interrogare "to ask, question, inquire; interrogate judicially, cross-examine," from inter "between" (see inter-) + rogare "to ask, to question," apparently a figurative use of a PIE verb meaning literally "to stretch out (the hand)," from root *reg- "move in a straight line."
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prorogue (v.)

early 15c., prorogen, "to prolong, extend" (a truce, agreement, etc.), a sense now obsolete, from Old French proroger, proroguer (14c.) and directly from Latin prorogare, literally "to ask publicly," from pro "before" (see pro-) + rogare "to ask, inquire, question; ask a favor," also "to propose (a law, a candidate);" see rogation. Perhaps the original sense in Latin was "to ask for public assent to extending someone's term in office."

The parliamentary meaning "discontinue temporarily, adjourn until a later time without dissolution" is attested from mid-15c. Related: Prorogued; prorogation.

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