Etymology
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notice (n.)

early 15c., "information, knowledge, intelligence," from Old French notece (14c.), and directly from Latin notitia "a being known, celebrity, fame, knowledge," from notus "known," past participle of (g)noscere "come to know, to get to know, get acquainted (with)," from PIE *gno-sko-, a suffixed form of PIE root *gno- "to know."

Sense of "formal statement conveying information or warning" is attested from 1590s. Meaning "heed, regard, cognizance" (as in take notice) is from 1590s. Meaning "a sign giving information" is from 1805. Meaning "written remarks or comments" especially on a new book or play is by 1835.

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informant (n.)
1690s, "someone who supplies information," from Latin informantem (nominative informans), present participle of informare "train, instruct, educate" (see inform). Occasionally as "one who gives information to the authorities, one who dishonorably betrays knowledge gained in confidence" (1783). Informer is older in both senses and more usual in the latter. As an adjective from 1890.
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know (n.)
"inside information," 1883, in in the know, from know (v.) Earlier it meant "knowledge, fact of knowing" (1590s).
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tip-off (n.)
1901 in reference to information, from tip (v.2) + off (adv.). From 1924 in basketball, from tip (v.3).
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counterintelligence (n.)

also counter-intelligence, "act of preventing an enemy from obtaining secret information," 1940, from counter- + intelligence.

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tipster (n.)
"one who provides private information," 1862, from tip (v.2) + -ster.
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reporting (n.)

mid-15c., "a written document," verbal noun from report (v.). By 1861 as "newspaper work involving gathering information and writing accounts for publication."

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brief (v.)
"to give instructions or information to," 1866; originally "to instruct by a brief" (1862), from brief (n.). Related: Briefed; briefing.
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macropaedia (n.)

1974, introduced with the 15th edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica, for the part of the encyclopedia in which information was presented in full essays, from macro- + ending from encyclopaedia.

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indicia (n.)
"indications, discriminating marks," Latin plural of indicium "a notice, information, disclosure, discovery," from index (genitive indicis); see index (n.).
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