Etymology
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multivariate (adj.)

in statistics, "involving or having two or more variables," 1928, from multi- "many" + -variate, from Latin variatio "a difference, variation, change," from past-participle stem of variare "to change" (see vary).

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yearbook (n.)
also year-book, 1580s, "book of reports of cases in law-courts for that year," from year + book (n.). Meaning "book of events and statistics of the previous year" is recorded from 1710. Sense of "graduating class album" is attested from 1926, American English.
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percentile (n.)

in statistics, "each of a series of values obtained by dividing a large number of quantities into 100 equal groups in order of magnitude," 1885, coined by English scientist Francis Galton (1822-1911) from percent + -ile.

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statistic (n.)
1852, "one numerical statistic," see statistics. From 1939 in reference to a person (considered as nothing more than an example of some measured quantity).
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demography (n.)

"that branch of anthropology which studies life-conditions of a people by its vital and social statistics," 1880, from Greek dēmos "people" (see demotic) + -graphy.

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field-work (n.)
1767, "gathering statistics or doing research out-of-doors or on-site," from field (n.) + work (n.). From 1819 in reference to a type of military fortification raised by troops in the field.
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quartile (n.)

mid-15c., originally in astrology and astronomy in the phrase quartile aspect in reference to celestial bodies when 90 degrees apart in longitude; see quartile (adj.). In statistics, from 1879.

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-ile 
also -il, word-forming element denoting ability or capacity, from Old French -il or directly from Latin adjectival suffix -ilis. Used in classical and Medieval Latin to form ordinal numbers, which accounts for its use from late 19c. in statistics (percentile, etc.).
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decile (adj.)

1670s in astrology, of planets, "one-tenth part of the zodiac distant from one another;" 1882 in statistics; from French décile or Medieval Latin *decilis, from Latin decem "ten" (from PIE root *dekm- "ten") on the model of quintilis, sextilis.

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weight (v.)
"to load with weight," 1747 (figuratively, of the mind, from 1640s), from weight (n.). Of horses in a handicap race, 1846. Sense in statistics is recorded from 1901. Related: Weighted; weighting.
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