Etymology
Advertisement
neonatology (n.)
branch of medicine concerned with newborn infants, 1960, from neonate "recently born infant" + -ology.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
saprophagous (adj.)

"feeding on putrid matter," 1819, Modern Latin; see sapro- + -phagous.

Related entries & more 
piscivorous (adj.)

"fish-eating, habitually feeding upon fish," 1660s, from Latin piscis "a fish" (from PIE root *pisk- "a fish") + -vorous "eating, devouring."

Related entries & more 
ophiophagous (adj.)

"serpent-eating," 1640s; see ophio- "serpent, snake" + -phagous "eating, feeding on." 

Related entries & more 
manchild (n.)

also man-child, "male child, male infant," late 14c., from man (n.) + child.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
gavage (n.)
"force-feeding of poultry for market," 1889, from French gavage, from gaver "to stuff" (17c.; see gavotte).
Related entries & more 
frugivorous (adj.)
"feeding on fruits," 1833, from Latin frugi-, stem of frux "fruit, produce" (see frugal) + -vorous "eating, devouring."
Related entries & more 
merdivorous (adj.)

"feeding upon dung," 1856, from Modern Latin, from Latin merda "dung, excrement" (see merde) + -vorous. Perhaps based in French merdivores (by 1830).

Related entries & more 
Infanta (n.)
"daughter of a king of Spain or Portugal," c. 1600, from Spanish and Portuguese infanta, fem. of infante "a youth; a prince of royal blood," from Latin infantem (see infant).
Related entries & more 
rhizophagous (adj.)

"root-eating, habitually feeding on roots," 1831 (Carlyle), from Greek rhiza "root" (see rhizo-) + -phagous "eating."

Related entries & more 

Page 2