Etymology
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lechery (n.)
"lewdness in living, habitual lustful indulgence," c. 1200, from Old French lecherie "gluttony, sensuality, lewdness," from lecheor "debauched man" (see lecher).
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gluttony (n.)
"extravagant indulgence of appetite," c. 1200, glutunie, from Old French glotonie "debauchery, gluttony," from gloton "glutton" (see glutton). Gluttonry recorded from late 12c.
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self-indulgent (adj.)

"given to undue gratification of one's own passions, desires, etc.,"  1791, a back-formation from self-indulgence or else from self- + indulgent. Related: Self-indulgently.

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sensualism (n.)

1803, "the philosophical doctrine that the senses are the sole source of knowledge," from sensual + -ism. From 1813 as "addiction to sensual indulgence, state of subjection to sensual appetites."

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epicureanism (n.)
1751, with reference to the philosophical system of Epicurus; 1847 in a general sense "attachment to or indulgence in luxurious habits," from epicurean + -ism. Earlier was epicurism (1570s).
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bloat (n.)
1860, "a contemptible person" (perhaps with notions of being bloated by indulgence in alcohol, etc.), from bloat (v.). By 1878 as a disease of livestock; meaning "bloatedness" is from 1905.
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forgiveness (n.)

Old English forgiefnes, forgifennys "pardon, forgiveness, indulgence," from past participle of forgifan (see forgive) + -ness. Contracted from *forgiven-ness. Middle English had also forgift (early 14c.).

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debauchery (n.)

"excessive indulgence in sensual pleasures of any kind," 1640s, from debauch + -ery. With a variety of spellings in 17c., such as debaush-, deboich-, debosh-. Debauchment in the same sense is from 1620s.

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sobriety (n.)
c. 1400, "moderation in indulgence," from Old French sobriete "sobriety, moderation" (Modern French sobrieté) or directly from Latin sobrietatem (nominative sobrietas), from sobrius (see sober (adj.)). Meaning "steadiness, gravity" is recorded from 1540s.
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rubicund (adj.)

early 15c. (Chauliac), "reddish, flushed," especially of the face, especially as a result of indulgence in appetites, from Old French rubicond (14c.) and directly from Latin rubicundus, from rubere "to be red," from ruber "red" (from PIE root *reudh- "red, ruddy"). Related: Rubicundity.

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