Etymology
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reminisce (v.)

1829, "to recollect," a back-formation from reminiscence. Meaning "indulge in reminiscences" is from 1871. "[S]omewhat colloquial" [OED] and mistrusted by the literary (in the OED's earliest citation for it, reminisce is followed immediately by an aside, "the word shall never enter my vocabulary"). Related: Reminisced. Reminiscing as a verbal noun, "action of remembering," is by 1891.

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cosset (v.)

1650s, "to fondle, caress, indulge, make a pet of," from a noun (1570s) meaning "lamb brought up as a pet" (applied to persons from 1590s), of uncertain origin. Perhaps [Skeat] from Old English cot-sæta "one who dwells in a cot" (see cote (n.) + sit (v.)). Related: Coseted; coseting. Compare German Hauslamm, Italian casiccio.

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pride (v.)

mid-12c. priden, in the reflexive sense "congratulate (oneself), be proud, indulge in self-esteem;" c. 1200 as "be arrogant, act haughtily," from pride (n.). Middle English also had a verb prouden, from the adjective, and Old English had prytan, prydan "be or become arrogant or haughty." Related: Prided; priding.

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canoodle (v.)
"to indulge in caresses and fondling endearments" [OED], by 1850s, said to be U.S. slang, of uncertain origin. The earliest known sources are British, but they tend to identify the word as American. In the 1830s it seems to have been in use in Britain in a sense of "cheat" or "overpower." Related: Canoodled; canoodling.
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pamper (v.)

late 14c., pamperen, "to cram with food, indulge with food," probably from a Low German source such as Middle Dutch (compare West Flemish pamperen "cram with food, overindulge;" dialectal German pampen "to cram"), probably from a frequentative of the root of pap (n.1). Meaning "treat luxuriously, overindulge" (transitive) is attested by 1520s. Related: Pampered; pampering.

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unfavorable (adj.)

also unfavourable, mid-15c. (implied in unfavorably), from un- (1) "not" + favorable (adj.).

"We must not indulge in unfavorable views of mankind, since by doing it we make bad men believe that they are no worse than others, and we teach the good that they are good in vain." [Walter Savage Landor, "Imaginary Conversations"]
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cherish (v.)

early 14c., cherischen, "hold as dear, treat with tenderness and affection," from Old French cheriss-, present participle stem of chierir "to hold dear" (12c., Modern French chérir), from chier "dear," from Latin carus "dear, costly, beloved" (from PIE root *ka- "to like, desire"). The Latin word also is the source of Italian, Spanish, Portuguese caro; Old Provençal, Catalan car. Meaning "indulge and encourage in the mind" is from late 14c. Related: Cherished; cherishing.

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cancan (n.)
also can-can, "A kind of dance performed in low resorts by men and women, who indulge in extravagant postures and lascivious gestures" [Century Dictionary, 1895], 1848, from French, a slang or cant term possibly from can, a French children's word for "duck" (see canard), via some notion of "waddling" too obscure or obscene to attempt to disentangle here. Or perhaps from French cancan (16c.) "noise, disturbance," echoic of quacking.
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sentimentalize (v.)

also sentimentalise, 1764, intransitive, "indulge in sentiments, play the sentimentalist," from sentimental + -ize. Meaning "to make sentimental" (transitive) is from 1813. Related: Sentimentalized; sentimentalizing.

Think on these things, and let S______ go to Lincoln sessions by himself, and talk classically with country justices. In the meantime we will philosophize and sentimentalize;—the last word is a bright invention of the moment in which it was written, for yours or Dr. Johnson's service .... [Laurence Sterne, letter to William Combe, Esq., dated Aug. 5, 1764, published 1787]
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palaver (n.)

1733 (implied in palavering), "a long talk, a conference, a tedious discussion," sailors' slang, from Portuguese palavra "word, speech, talk," from a metathesis of Late Latin parabola "speech, discourse," from Latin parabola "comparison" (see parable). A doublet of parole.

In West Africa the Portuguese word became a traders' term for "negotiating with the natives," and apparently English picked up the word there. (The Spanish cognate, palabra, appears 16c.-17c. in Spanish phrases used in English.) The meaning "idle profuse talk" is recorded by 1748. The verb, "indulge in palaver," is by 1733, from the noun. Related: Palavering.

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