Etymology
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uninterested (adj.)
1640s, "unbiased," from un- (1) "not" + past participle of interest (v.). It later meant "disinterested" (1660s); sense of "unconcerned, indifferent" is recorded from 1771. This is the correct word for what often is miscalled disinterested.
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amoral (adj.)

"ethically indifferent," 1882, a hybrid formed from Greek-derived a- "not" (see a- (3)) + moral, which is from Latin. Apparently coined by Robert Louis Stevenson as a differentiation from immoral.

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regardless (adj.)

1590s, "indifferent, not heeding or looking," from regard (n.) + -less. As elliptical for "regardless of consequences, expenses, etc.," from 1872. Regardful is attested from 1580s. Related: Regardlessly; regardlessness.

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blah (n.)
"idle, meaningless talk," 1918, probably echoic; the adjective meaning "bland, dull" is from 1919, perhaps influenced by French blasé "bored, indifferent." The blahs "depression" is attested by 1966.
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meanly (adv.)

1580s, "poorly, in an indifferent manner or condition;" 1590s, "in a low or humble degree, in a low rank in life;" c. 1600, "sordidly," later "illiberally;" from mean (adj.1) in its various later senses + -ly (2). Middle English had menelich "humbly, poorly;" Old English gemænelice "commonly, generally."

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sate (v.)

"to satisfy, fill full, surfeit," c. 1600, probably an alteration (by influence of Latin satiare "satiate") of Middle English saden "become weary or indifferent; satiate," from Old English sadian "to satiate, fill; be sated, get wearied" (see sad (adj.)), ultimately from PIE root *sa- "to satisfy." Related: Sated; sating.

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latitudinarian (adj.)
1660s, "characterized by broad-mindedness," especially in reference to 17c. Episcopal clergymen indifferent to doctrinal details; a pseudo-Latin construction from latitude in its meaning "freedom from narrow restrictions" (c. 1600) + ending as in sectarian, etc. Also as a noun from 1660s. Related: Latitudinarianism "liberality of opinion in religion" (1670s); earlier in that sense was latitudinism (1660s).
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Miocene (adj.)

"pertaining to the geological period between the Oligocene and Pliocene," 1831, irregular formation from Greek meion "less" (from PIE root *mei- (2) "small") + -cene "new, recent." The intention is "the middle division of the Tertiary period."

A typical example of the monstrosities with which scientific men in want of a label for something, and indifferent to all beyond their own province, defile the language. The elements of the word are Greek, but not the way they are put together, nor the meaning demanded of the compound. [Fowler]
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argon (n.)
chemical element, 1894, Modern Latin, from Greek argon, neuter of argos "lazy, idle, not working the ground, living without labor," from a- "without" (see a- (3)) + ergon "work," from PIE root *werg- "to do." So called by its discoverers, Baron Rayleigh and Sir William Ramsay, for its inert qualities. They described it as "most astonishingly indifferent."
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poetaster (n.)

"a petty poet, a feeble rhymster, a writer of indifferent verses," 1590s, from French poetastre (1550s), from Latin poeta (see poet) + French-derived -aster, a diminutive (pejorative) suffix. Old Norse had skaldfifl in roughly the same sense. Early modern English had rimester (1580s). Swinburne (1872) used poeticule. Related: Poetastry.

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