Etymology
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shammy (n.)

1650s, phonological spelling of chamois. Other bungled spellings include shambo (1610s), shamois, shamoys, shammies. Compare shay from chaise; shappo (1700) for chapeau; shapperoon (1620s) for chaperon.

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sexploitation (n.)
1942, from sex (n.) + exploitation. Other similar coinages include sexpert (1924); sexcapade (1953); sexational (1927); and sexophone in "Brave New World."
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comprise (v.)

early 15c., "to include," from Old French compris, past participle of comprendre "to contain, comprise" (12c.), from Latin comprehendere "to take together, to unite; include; seize; to comprehend, perceive" (to seize or take in the mind), from com "with, together," here probably "completely" (see com-) + prehendere "to catch hold of, seize," from prae- "before" (see pre-) + -hendere, from PIE root *ghend- "to seize, take." Related: Comprised; comprising. From late 15c. as "to contain," as parts making up a whole; from 1794 as "to constitute, make up, compose."

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pyjamas (n.)
also pyjama (adj.), chiefly British English spelling of pajamas. Early spellings in English also include pai jamahs (1800); pigammahs (1834), peijammahs (1840).
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raging (adj.)

late 15c., "full of rage," present-participle adjective from rage (v.). By 1886 as "very successful." Other, less common, adjectives include rageful (1570s); rageous (mid-15c.), ragesome (1913).

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Chesapeake 

large bay in eastern U.S., from a central Atlantic coast Algonquian language, perhaps literally "great shellfish bay" [Bright]. Early spellings include Chesepiooc and Chesupioc.

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onomatopoeic (adj.)

"pertaining to, characterized by, or of the nature of onomatopoeia," 1835, from French onomatopoéique or else from onomatopoeia + -ic. Other adjectival forms include onomatopoeial; onomatopoetic (1827); onomatopoeous (1660s). 

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overcoat (n.)

"large coat worn over ordinary clothing," 1802, from over- + coat (n.). Earlier words include overcloth "an outer garment" (late 14c.); overgarment "outer coat" (late 15c.).

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feuillemorte (adj.)
"of the color of a dead leaf," 1640s, fieulamort, from French feuille morte, literally "dead leaf" (see folio + mortal (adj.)). A word of loose spelling, variants include phyllamort, filemot, philomot.
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al- 
in words from Arabic (or assumed to be), it is the definite article "the." Sometimes rendered in English as el-. Often assimilated to following consonants (as-, az-, ar-, am-, an-, etc.). Examples include almanac, alchemy, alcohol, algebra.
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