Etymology
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verge (v.1)
"tend, incline," c. 1600, from Latin vergere "to bend, turn, tend toward, incline," from PIE *werg- "to turn," from root *wer- (2) "to turn, bend." Influenced by verge (v.2) "provide with a border" (c. 1600); "be adjacent to" (1787), from verge (n.). Related: Verged; verging.
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wriggle (v.)
late 15c., from Middle Low German wrigglen "to wriggle," from Proto-Germanic *wrig-, from *wreik- "to turn," from PIE root *wer- (2) "to turn, bend." Related to Old English wrigian "to turn, incline, go forward."
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bias (v.)
"giving a bias to, causing to incline to one side," 1610s literal; 1620s figurative; from bias (n.). Compare French biasier. Related: Biased; biasing.
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clino- 
before vowels clin-, word-forming element meaning "slope, slant, incline," from Latinized form of Greek klinein "to lean, slope," from PIE root *klei- "to lean."
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predispose (v.)

"incline beforehand, put into a certain frame of mind, render susceptible either mentally or physically," 1640s, perhaps a back-formation from predisposition or else from or based on French predisposer (15c.). Related: Predisposed; predisposing.

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slope (n.)
1610s, "inclination," from slope (v.). Meaning "an incline, a slant (of ground)" is from 1620s. Derogatory slang meaning "Oriental person" is attested from 1948.
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synclinal (adj.)
"sloping downward on both sides," 1833 (in Lyell), from -al (1) + Latinized form of stem of Greek synklinein "to incline, lean," from syn- "together" (see syn-) + klinein "to slope," from PIE root *klei- "to lean."
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penchant (n.)

"strong inclination," 1670s, from French penchant, noun use of present participle of Old French pencher "to incline," from Vulgar Latin *pendicare, a frequentative formed from Latin pendere "to hang, cause to hang" (from PIE root *(s)pen- "to draw, stretch, spin").

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bank (v.2)
1580s, "to form a bank or slope or rise," from bank (n.2). Meaning "to rise in banks" is by 1870. That of "to ascend," as of an incline, is from 1892. In aeronautics, from 1911. Related: Banked; banking.
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tend (v.1)
"to incline, to move in a certain direction," early 14c., from Old French tendre "stretch out, hold forth, hand over, offer" (11c.), from Latin tendere "to stretch, extend, make tense; aim, direct; direct oneself, hold a course," from PIE root *ten- "to stretch."
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