Etymology
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sandalwood (n.)

1510s, earlier simply sandell (late 14c.), saundres (early 14c.), "the wood of the heart and roots of certain species of trees native to Asia," from Old French sandale, from Medieval Latin sandalum, from Late Greek santalon, which is ultimately from Sanskrit čandana-m "the sandalwood tree," perhaps literally "wood for burning incense," related to candrah "shining, glowing," and cognate with Latin candere "to shine, glow" (see candle). In China it was burnt extensively as incense in temples and homes. Sandalwood oil, distilled from the wood of some species, is strongly aromatic and used in perfumes and cosmetics.

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joss (n.)
"Chinese figure of a deity," 1711, from Chinese Pidgin English, from Javanese dejos, a word formed 16c. from Portuguese deus "god," from Latin deus (from PIE root *dyeu- "to shine," in derivatives "sky, heaven, god"). Colloquially, it came to mean "luck." Joss-stick "Chinese incense" first recorded 1831.
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Hong Kong 
former British colony in China, from Cantonese pronunciation of Chinese Xianggang, literally "fragrant port." Perhaps so called from the scent of incense factories or opium cargoes, or from the semi-fresh waters of the bay. The Cantonese word hong, literally "row, series" was the general English term for foreign trading establishments in China (warehouse viewed as a row of rooms).
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shewbread (n.)
1530, Tyndale's word (Exodus xxv:30), based on or influenced by German schaubrot (in Luther), literally "show-bread," translating Latin panes propositiones, from Greek artai enopioi, from Hebrew lechem panim, the 12 loaves placed every Sabbath "before the Lord" on a table beside the altar of incense, from lechem "bread" + panim "face, presence." Old English translations used offring-hlafas.
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benzoin (n.)

balsamic resin obtained from a tree (Styrax benzoin) of Indonesia, 1560s (earlier as bengewine, 1550s), from French benjoin (16c.), which comes via Spanish, Portuguese, or Italian from Arabic luban jawi "incense of Java" (actually Sumatra, but the Arabs confused the two), with lu probably mistaken in Romance languages for a definite article. The English form with -z- is perhaps from influence of Italian benzoi (Venetian, 1461).

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myrrh (n.)

"gummy, resinous exudation of certain plants of Arabia and Ethiopia," used for incense, perfumery, etc., Middle English mirre, from Old French mirre (11c.) and also from Old English myrre, both the Old English and Old French words from Latin myrrha (source also of Dutch mirre, German Myrrhe, French myrrhe, Italian, Spanish mirra), from Greek myrrha, from a Semitic source (compare Akkadian murru, Hebrew mor, Arabic murr "myrrh"), from a root meaning "was bitter." The classical spelling restoration is from 16c.

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*dheu- (1)

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "dust, vapor, smoke." 

It forms all or part of: enthymeme; fewmet; fume; fumigation; funk; perfume; sfumato; typhoid; typhoon; typhus.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit dhuma- "smoke, fume;" Greek thymos "spirit, courage, anger," thymiao "fumigate," thymin "incense;" Latin fumus "smoke, steam, fume;" Lithuanian dūmai "smoke" (plural); Old Prussian dumis "smoke;" Old Church Slavonic dymu "smoke;" Middle Irish dumacha "fog;" perhaps Old High German toum "steam, vapor."

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