Etymology
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in-flight (adj.)
also inflight, "during or within a flight," 1945, from in (prep.) + flight.
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plug-in (adj.)

"designed to be plugged into a socket," 1922, from the verbal phrase, from plug (v.) + in (adv.).

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in-depth (adj.)

"profoundly, with careful attention and deep insight," 1967, from the adjective phrase (attested by 1959); see in (adv.) + depth.

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in-patient (n.)
also inpatient, "person lodged and fed, as well as treated, at a hospital or infirmary," 1760, from in (adj.) + patient (n.). As an adjective by 1890.
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all-in (adj.)
"without restrictions," 1890, from the adverbial phrase; see all + in (adv.).
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in-house (adj.)
also inhouse, 1955, from in (prep.) + house (n.).
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in-store (adj.)
also instore, 1954, from in (prep.) + store (n.). In Middle English, instore was a verb meaning "to restore, renew," from Latin instaurare.
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log in (v.)
verbal phrase, 1963 in the computing sense, from log (v.2) + in (adv.).
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tie-in (n.)
"connection," 1934, from verbal phrase (attested by 1793), from tie (v.) + in (adv.).
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shoo-in (n.)
"easy winner" (especially in politics), 1939, from earlier sense "horse that wins a race by pre-arrangement" (1928); the verb phrase shoo in in this sense is from 1908; from shoo (v.) + in (adv.).
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