Etymology
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Shema 
from Hebrew shema "hear!," imperative of shama "to hear." First word of Deuteronomy vi.4.
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scram (v.)
1928, U.S. slang, either a shortened form of scramble (v.) or from German schramm, imperative singular of schrammen "depart." Related: Scrammed; scramming.
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vade-mecum (n.)
"a pocket manual, handbook," 1620s, Latin, literally "go with me;" from imperative of vadere "to go" (see vamoose) + me "me" + cum "with."
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mush (interj.)

command to sled dogs, 1897, first recorded 1862, as mouche, perhaps altered from French marchons! "advance!" (imperative of marcher "to march;" see march (v.)). Related: Musher.

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ave 
"hail," also "farewell," early 13c. (in reference to the Ave Maria), from Latin ave, second person singular imperative of avere "to be or fare well."
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allons 
"well!" French, literally "let us go," first person plural imperative of aller "to go" (see alley (n.1)).
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voila (interj.)
1739, French voilà, imperative of voir "to see, to view" (from Latin videre "to see;" see vision) + la "there" (from Latin ille "yonder;" see le).
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experto crede 
Latin, "take it from one who knows" ("Aeneid," xi.283); dative singular of expertus (see expert (adj.)) + imperative singular of credere "to believe" (see credo).
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quaere 

Latin imperative of quaerere "to ask, inquire" (see query (v.)). Used in English in the sense of "one may ask" (1530s) as an introduction to a question. Also used as a synonym of query (1580s).

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q.v. 

abbreviation of the Latin phrase quod vide "which see," placed after a dictionary entry, book title, etc., to refer the reader to it for further information. From neuter of qui "who" + imperative singular of videre "to see."

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