Etymology
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foot-path (n.)

also footpath, "narrow path or way for foot travelers only," 1520s, from foot (n.) + path.

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foot-board (n.)

"a support for the foot" in a carriage, vehicle, workplace, etc., 1766, from foot (n.) + board (n.1).

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foot-bridge (n.)

"bridge for foot passengers," c. 1500, from foot (n.) + bridge (n.1).

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foot-race (n.)

"race run between persons on foot," 1660s, from foot (n.) + race (n.1).

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club-foot (n.)

also clubfoot, "deformed foot," 1530s, from club (n.) + foot (n.). Related: Club-footed.

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foot-locker (n.)
1905, U.S. military, from foot (n.) + locker.
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talipes (n.)
"club-foot, deformed foot," from Latin talus "ankle" (see talus (n.1)) + pes "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot"). The notion seems to be "walking on the ankles."
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immerge (v.)
1620s (trans.), "immerse, plunge into (a fluid)," from Latin immergere "to dip, plunge into" (see immersion). Intransitive sense from 1706. Rare; the usual verb is immerse. Related: Immerged; immerging.
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pedestrian (adj.)

1716, "prosaic, dull" (of writing), from Latin pedester (genitive pedestris) "plain, not versified, prosaic," literally "on foot" (sense contrasted with equester "on horseback"), from pedes "one who goes on foot," from pes (genitive pedis) "foot," from PIE root *ped- "foot." Meaning "going on foot" is attested by 1791 in English (it also was a sense of Latin pedester). Earlier adjective pedestrial (1610s) meant "of or pertaining to the foot."

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