Etymology
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heortology (n.)
"study of religious feasts and calendars," 1881, from Greek heorte "a feast or festival, holiday," + -ology. The immediate source of the English word is in French or German. Related: Heortological (1880).
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emergency (n.)
"unforeseen occurrence requiring immediate attention," 1630s, from Latin emergens, present participle of emergere "to rise out or up" (see emerge). Or from emerge + -ency. As an adjective by 1881.
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disorientation (n.)

1846, "deviation from an east-facing position;" 1882, "confusion as to direction;" see dis- + orientation. Perhaps its immediate origin in some cases is as a noun of action or state from disorientate (1704).

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lash (n.)
c. 1300, las "a blow, a stroke," later "flexible part of a whip" (late 14c.), possibly imitative; compare lash (v.1), which might be the immediate source of this. Century Dictionary says Irish lasg "a lash, whip, whipping" is of English origin. The lash "punishment by flogging" is from 1690s.
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consequential (adj.)

1620s, "not direct or immediate," from consequent (Latin consequentia) + -al (1). Sense of "following as an effect or result" is from 1650s. Of persons, "self-important," 1758, from obsolete sense in reference to things, "important, pregnant with consequences" (1728). Related: Consequentially (c. 1600).

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decentralization (n.)

"act or principle of removing local or special functions of government from immediate control of central authority," 1839, from de- + centralization. Decentralisation is attested by 1835 in German, in reference to France, but the word does not seem to appear in French before the earliest English dates.

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intuition (n.)
mid-15c., intuicioun, "insight, direct or immediate cognition, spiritual perception," originally theological, from Late Latin intuitionem (nominative intuitio) "a looking at, consideration," noun of action from past participle stem of Latin intueri "look at, consider," from in- "at, on" (from PIE root *en "in") + tueri "to look at, watch over" (see tutor (n.)).
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phylum (n.)

"a primary division of the plant or animal kingdom, a genetically related tribe or race of organisms," 1868, Modern Latin, coined by French naturalist Georges Léopole Chrétien Frédéric Dagobert, Baron Cuvier (1769-1832) from Greek phylon "race, stock," related to phylē "tribe, clan" (see phylo-). The immediate source of the English word probably is from German.

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proximate (adj.)

1590s (implied in proximately), "closely neighboring; next, immediate, without intervention of a third," from Late Latin proximatus, past participle of proximare "to draw near, approach," from proximus "nearest, next; most direct; adjoining," figuratively "latest, most recent; next, following; most faithful," superlative of prope "near" (see propinquity). Meaning "coming next in a chain of causation" is by 1660s. Related: Proximately.

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intuit (v.)
1776, "to tutor," from Latin intuit-, past participle stem of intueri "look at, consider," from in- "at, on" (from PIE root *en "in") + tueri "to look at, watch over" (see tutor (n.)). Meaning "to perceive directly without reasoning, know by immediate perception" is from 1840 (De Quincey), in this sense perhaps a back-formation from intuition. Related: Intuited; intuiting.
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