Etymology
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fancied (adj.)

"imaginary, formed by the fancy," 1560s, past-participle adjective from fancy (v.).

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wonderland (n.)

"imaginary realm," 1787, from wonder (n.) + land (n.).

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heffalump (n.)

imaginary creature, 1926 (A.A. Milne), from a child's pronunciation of elephant.

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whangdoodle (n.)

name of an imaginary creature or thing, 1858, American English, fanciful formation.

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horse-marine (n.)

1824, "one of an imaginary corps of mounted sailors," hence "a person out of his element and unfit for his place" [Century Dictionary], from horse (n.) + marine (n.). However by 1878 the term was being used in fact in reference to cavalrymen pressed into marine service or seamen mounted as an improvised shore defense.

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Mummerset (n.)

"imaginary west-of-England country dialect used on stage," by 1925, from mummer + Somerset.

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plutomania (n.)

1650s, "mad pursuit of wealth," from Greek ploutos "wealth" (see Pluto) + mania. As a form of insanity, "imaginary possession of wealth," from 1894. Related: Plutomaniac.

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flatland (n.)

1735, from flat (adj.) + land (n.). Edwin Abbott's popular book about an imaginary two-dimensional world was published in 1884.

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sooterkin (n.)

1680s, imaginary rat-like after-birth believed to be gotten by Dutch women by sitting over stoves, 1680s.

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hyperspace (n.)

1866, in geometry, "imaginary space of more than three dimensions," from hyper- "over, above, beyond" + space (n.). A hybrid; correctly formed it would be superspace.

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