Etymology
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Cloud Cuckoo Land 

imaginary city built in air, 1830, translating Aristophanes' Nephelokokkygia in "The Birds" (414 B.C.E.). Cloud-land "place above the earth or away from the practical things of life, dreamland, the realm of fancy" is attested from 1840.

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fancied (adj.)
"imaginary, formed by the fancy," 1560s, past-participle adjective from fancy (v.).
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Gondal 
imaginary land invented by the Brontë sisters, also the name of its inhabitants.
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wonderland (n.)
"imaginary realm," 1787, from wonder (n.) + land (n.).
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John Q. Public (n.)
"imaginary average American citizen," 1934; the Q perhaps suggested by John Quincy Adams.
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horse-marine (n.)
1824, "one of an imaginary corps of mounted sailors," hence "a person out of his element and unfit for his place" [Century Dictionary], from horse (n.) + marine (n.). However by 1878 the term was being used in fact in reference to cavalrymen pressed into marine service or seamen mounted as an improvised shore defense.
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heffalump (n.)
imaginary creature, 1926 (A.A. Milne), from a child's pronunciation of elephant.
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whangdoodle (n.)
name of an imaginary creature or thing, 1858, American English, fanciful formation.
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Ruritanian (adj.)

"utopian," 1896, from Ruritania, name of an imaginary kingdom in "The Prisoner of Zenda" (1894) by Anthony Hope (1863-1933), who coined it from Latin rus (genitive ruris) "country" (see rural) + Latinate ending -itania (as in Lusitania, Mauritania). Ruritania as a recognizable generic name for an imaginary country lasted into the 1970s.

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Mummerset (n.)

"imaginary west-of-England country dialect used on stage," by 1925, from mummer + Somerset.

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