Etymology
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illing (n.)
"evil-doing, malevolent treatment," early 13c., verbal noun from ill (v.).
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illness (n.)
"disease, sickness, ailment, malady," 1680s, from ill (adj.) + -ness. Earlier it meant "bad moral quality" (c. 1500).
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illy (adv.)
"in an ill manner," 1540s, from ill (adj.) + -ly (2). Correctly formed but seldom used; simple ill generally serving as the adverb.
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illth (n.)

"what leads one to a bad state or condition," 1867, coined by John Ruskin from ill (adv.) on model of wealth (also see -th (2)).

[S]uch things, and so much of them as he can use, are, indeed, well for him, or Wealth; and more of them, or any other things, are ill for him, or Illth. [Ruskin, "Munera Pulveris"]
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sicken (v.)
c. 1200, "to become ill," from sick (adj.) + -en (1). Transitive sense of "to make sick" is recorded from 1610s. Related: Sickened; sickening. The earlier verb was simply sick (Old English seocan) "to be ill, fall ill."
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malevolence (n.)

"the character of being ill-disposed toward another or others; ill-will, malice, personal hatred," mid-15c., from Old French malevolence and directly from Latin malevolentia "ill-will, dislike, hatred," from malevolentem (nominative malevolens) "ill-disposed, wishing ill, spiteful, envious," from male "badly" (see mal-) + volentem (nominative volens), present participle of velle "to wish" (see will (v.)) 

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grump (n.)
"ill-humor," 1727, in humps and grumps "surly remarks," later the grumps "a fit of ill-humor" (1844), then "a person in ill humor" (1900); perhaps an extended sense of grum "morose, surly," which probably is related to Danish grum "cruel;" or perhaps suggested by grumble, grunt, etc.
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misbecome (v.)

"suit ill, be unfitting," 1520s, from mis- (1) "badly, wrongly" + become.

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malicious (adj.)

mid-13c., "harboring ill-will, enmity, or hostility," from Old French malicios "showing ill will, spiteful, wicked" (Modern French malicieux), from Latin malitiosus "wicked, malicious," from malitia "badness, ill will, spite," from malus "bad, unpleasant" (see mal-). In legal use (early 14c., Anglo-French), it means "characterized by malice prepense" (see malice).

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angrily (adv.)
mid-14c., "resentfully, in anger; ill-temperedly," from angry + -ly (2).
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