Etymology
Advertisement
VHS 

1982, initialism (acronym) of Video Home System.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
metric (adj.)

"pertaining to the system of weights and measures based on the meter," 1855, from French métrique, from mèter (see meter (n.2)). In this sense, metrical is attested from 1797. Metric system is attested by 1855.

Related entries & more 
circuitry (n.)

"plan or system of electrical circuits," 1946, from circuit (n.)+ -ry.

Related entries & more 
p.a. (n.)

abbreviation of public address (system), attested from 1936.

Related entries & more 
neuroscience (n.)

"scientific study of the nervous system," 1963, from neuro- + science.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
backfire (n.)

1832, American English, originally "a fire deliberately lit ahead of an advancing wildfire to deprive it of fuel," from back (adj.) + fire (n.). As a verb in this sense, recorded from 1886.

The noun meaning "premature ignition in an internal-combustion engine" is recorded by 1897. As a verb, of schemes, plans, etc., "to affect the initiator rather than the intended object" it is attested from 1912, a figurative use from the accidental back-firing of firearms.

Related entries & more 
neurology (n.)

"scientific study of the form and function of the nervous system," 1680s, from Modern Latin neurologia, from Modern Greek neurologia (1660s), from neuro- "nerves, the nervous system" (see neuro-) + -logia "study" (see -logy). Related: Neurological (1755).

Related entries & more 
boot (v.2)

1975, transitive, "start up (a computer) by causing an operating system to load in the memory," from bootstrap (v.), a 1958 derived verb from bootstrap (n.) in the sense of "fixed sequence of instructions to load the operating system of a computer" (1953).

This is from the notion of the first-loaded program pulling itself (and the rest) up by the bootstrap. The intransitive use, of a computer operating system, is from 1983. Related: Booted; booting.

Related entries & more 
Peking 

former transliteration of the name of the Chinese capital city, now (in the pinyin system) called Beijing. In the Wade-Giles system it was Peiping; the form Peking pre-dates Wade-Giles and was formed by the old British-run, Hong Kong-based Chinese postal system. Peking duck, "large domestic duck of white plumage and orange beak and legs," is attested from 1880.

Related entries & more 
protectionism (n.)

"doctrine or system of protection in political economy," 1846, from protectionist + -ism.

Related entries & more 

Page 2