Etymology
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way-out (adj.)
1868, "far off," from way (adv.), short for away, + out. Sense of "original, bold," is jazz slang from 1940s, probably suggesting "far off" from what is conventional or expected.
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aikido (n.)
Japanese art of self-defense, 1936, literally "way of adapting the spirit," from Japanese ai "together" (from au "to harmonize") + ki "spirit" + do "way, art," from Chinese tao "way."
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tao (n.)
1736, from Chinese tao "way, path, right way (of life), reason."
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Norway 

European nation on the western part of the Scandinavian peninsula, Middle English Nor-weie, from Old English Norweg, Norþweg "Norway, the Norwegian coast," from Old Norse Norvegr "north way, a way leading to the north," from norðr (see north) + vegr "way," from Proto-Germanic *wegaz"course of travel, way" (from PIE root *wegh- "to go, move, transport in a vehicle"). Contrasted with suthrvegar "south way," i.e. Germany, and austrvegr "east way," the Baltic lands. Compare Norwegian.

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obviate (v.)

1590s, "to meet and dispose of, clear (something) out of the way," from Late Latin obviatus, past participle of obviare "act contrary to, go against," from Latin obvius "that is in the way, that moves against," from obviam (adv.) "in the way," from ob "in front of, against" (see ob-) + viam, accusative of via "way" (see via). Related: Obviated; obviating.

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lifeway (n.)
"way of life," 1963, an unconscious revival of Old English lifweg; see life (n.) + way (n.).
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archway (n.)
"entrance or passageway under an arch or vault," also arch-way, 1788, from arch (n.) + way (n.).
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alleyway (n.)
also alley-way, "small, short alley," as between two houses, 1788, from alley (n.1) + way (n.).
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byway (n.)
"a private, secluded, or out-of-the-way path or road," mid-14c., from by + way (n.).
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via (prep.)

1779, from Latin via "by way of," ablative form of via "way, road, path, highway, channel, course" (from PIE root *wegh- "to go, move, transport in a vehicle," which is also the source of English way (n.)).

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