Etymology
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foot-path (n.)

also footpath, "narrow path or way for foot travelers only," 1520s, from foot (n.) + path.

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foot-dragging (n.)

"deliberate slowness," 1966, from foot (n.) + present-participle adjective from drag (v.).

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club-foot (n.)

also clubfoot, "deformed foot," 1530s, from club (n.) + foot (n.). Related: Club-footed.

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foot-bridge (n.)

"bridge for foot passengers," c. 1500, from foot (n.) + bridge (n.1).

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foot-board (n.)

"a support for the foot" in a carriage, vehicle, workplace, etc., 1766, from foot (n.) + board (n.1).

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foot-locker (n.)

1905, U.S. military, from foot (n.) + locker.

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foot-race (n.)

"race run between persons on foot," 1660s, from foot (n.) + race (n.1).

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pettitoes (n.)

1550s, "the toes or feet of a pig," especially as an article of food," from petit + toes. Sometimes in jocular use, "the human foot."

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last (n.1)

"wooden model of a human foot used by shoemakers," from Old English læste "shoemaker's last," earlier last "track, footprint, footstep, trace," from Proto-Germanic *laisti- (source also of Old Norse leistr "the foot," Middle Dutch, Dutch leest "form, model, last," Old High German leist "track, footprint," German Leisten "last," Gothic laistjan "to follow"), related to Old English læran "to teach," from PIE root *lois- "furrow, track."

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